Main Herbal Antivirals: Heal Yourself Faster, Cheaper and Safer - Your A-Z Guide to Choosing, Preparing and..

Herbal Antivirals: Heal Yourself Faster, Cheaper and Safer - Your A-Z Guide to Choosing, Preparing and Using the Most Effective Natural Antiviral Herbs

Are you tired of using the nasty chemicals in medicine to fight your family's illnesses? Discover the power of natural medicines and herbs to eradicate your viral infections.
Are you scared of the hidden dangers in pharmaceutical medicines? Do normal treatments give you aches, pains, and other side effects? Is the cost of prescription medication making a major dent in your wallet? Author Mary Jones has dedicated years of her life to researching natural remedies and learning from naturopathic doctors. After proving the efficacy of these remedies in her own life, Jones has compiled all of her hard-earned information in one easy-to-use reference.

In Herbal Antivirals: Heal Yourself Faster, Cheaper and Safer - Your A-Z Guide to Choosing, Preparing and Using the Most Effective Natural Antiviral Herbs, you'll find the 45 most medically-effective herbs available. Through Jones' comprehensive resource, you'll learn how to replace medical antibiotics and antivirals with herbal remedies with far fewer side effects. The book shows once and for all that you can ditch high-cost pharmaceuticals and use natural remedies for nearly every common ailment.

In Herbal Antivirals, you'll discover:
The best herbal treatments for illnesses ranging from warts to chronic hepatitis B
Easy natural medicine preparation methods and the correct dosages you should use
The five key essential oils with natural antiviral properties
Which herbal antivirals are safe to use when pregnant or breastfeeding
Where to find and how to grow all the herbs you need, and much, much more!
Herbal Antivirals: Heal Yourself Faster, Cheaper and Safer is a comprehensively indexed, inspirational compendium that will help you benefit from the safe use of natural remedies. If you like herbal alternatives, easy-to-follow preparation instructions, and detailed references, then you'll love Mary Jones' painstakingly-compiled book.
Year:
2015
Edition:
Kindle Edition
Publisher:
Herbal Medicine
Language:
english
Pages:
162
ISBN 10:
1544295782
ISBN 13:
978-1544295787
ISBN:
B019M0YCRU
File:
EPUB, 2.93 MB
Download (epub, 2.93 MB)

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HERBAL ANTIVIRALS





Heal Yourself Faster, Cheaper and Safer


Your A-Z Guide to Choosing, Preparing and Using the Most Effective Natural Antiviral Herbs


By Mary Jones





Copyright© 2015 by Mary Jones - All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.

Copyright : No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the author, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages or reproduce illustrations in a review with appropriate credits; nor may any part of this book be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or other - without prior written permission of the copyright holder.

The information in this book is true and complete to the best of our knowledge. All recommendations are made without guarantee on the part of the author. The author disclaims any liability in connection with the use of this information.

First Printing, 2015 - Printed in the United States of America





“The healing comes from nature and not from the physician. Therefore the physician Must start from nature with an open mind”

- Paracelsus





TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction

Chapter 1 - Key Facts About Emerging Viruses

Chapter 2- Eye-Opening Alternative Medicine Statistics

Chapter 3 – Usage of Antivirals – All You Need to Know

Chapter 4 – Best Sources for Herbal Antivirals

Chapter 5 - Top 45 Antiviral Herbs

Chapter 6 – Little Known Herbal Remedy Recipes

Chapter 7 - Herbal Remedies for Common Ailments

Sources

FAQ

Conclusion

About the Author





INTRODUCTION


‘Herbalism ’ is the use of plants for medicinal purposes . Plants have been used as the basis of medication throughout human history to help prevent and cure a wide range of ailments. These remedies are recognized in modern medicine as ‘alternative treatments ’ and have been steadily increasing in popularity for many reasons, some of which are explained very well in the statement below from the Journal of Traditional and Com; plementary Medicine :

“Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. ”

In short, although antiviral medication is important, it isn’t always the answer. To prevent a growing resistance to the work of prescription medication, herbal remedies are brilliant for prevention – and cure when the virus isn’t life threatening. Herbal remedies are also brilliant for assisting with the side effects of medication , which will be examined within this guide.



Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically to cure viral illnesses. They work by inhibiting the development of the pathogen – preventing it from getting worse and taking over the body. Different antivirals work on different viruses, for example, Moroxydine works to cure RNA and DNA viruses.

The herbal antivirals that are available have been used for centuries, and many of them will be easily recognizable.

These are considered as the Top 10 antivirals:

Colloidal Silver, Zinc, Elderberry, Olive Leaf, Green Tea, Liquorice, Pau D’arco, St. John’s Wort, Garlic and Echinacea.

This book will look at these herbal antivirals – also giving the details of many more that are easily accessible to you. The benefits, risks and everything else to do with herbal remedies will be examined making this the most extensive guide available. Once you have read all of the information in the following chapters, you will be able to make an extremely informed decision about switching to the healthier, more natural alternative of herbal medication ! Of course, everything presented in this book is guideline only – you will need to consult your doctor before taking any of these herbal remedies.

Watch Antivirals Herbs to Kick Viruses out of the Body





CHAPTER 1


KEY FACTS ABOUT EMERGING VIRUSES


Every year, approximately 1.7 million people are affected by infections . In the US alone, over 100,000 people die because of infections they acquired in hospitals and health clinics. An emergent virus is one that has adapted and has developed into a new disease or pathogen. Most of these can be categorized as ‘zoonotic ’ which is an animal disease which has been transferred onto humans.

.

The factors that affect emerging viruses are:

Population movements – the movement of population.

Deforestation – natural forests are cleared through logging or burning.

Irrigation – the artificial application of water to assist the production of crops.

Urbanization – the increase of population in urban areas.

Increased long distance air travel.

Increased long distance air travel for livestock.

Migration – the movement of population with the intent of settling in someplace new.



A great example of an emerging virus is Poliomyelitis . It has been known to exist for centuries without any real impact, but it became more prominent in the 19th century, due to dense urban populations forcing people to live so closely together. This wasn’t resolved until the vaccine was invented.

Watch Dr. Leonard Horowitz on Emerging Viruses

Of course, more recent examples of emerging viruses are Aids and Ebola . As shown in the video above, Dr. Leonard Horowitz has recently done a very in-depth study on this very topic. Dr. Leonard Horowitz is an internationally known authority of behavioral science and public health education. He received his doctorate from Tufts University in dental medicine, a Master of Public Health degree in behavioral science from Harvard University, and a Masters of Arts degree in health education from Beacon College. He served on the faculties of Tufts and Harvard Universities and Leslie College’s Institute for the Arts and Human Development, directed a multidisciplinary health centre for over a decade, and currently serves as President of a non-profit health educational corporation.

He starts his study by saying “To do evil a human being must first of all believe what he is doing is good...” which demonstrates how it looks about human interference in these emerging viruses. His work examines how a lot of these emerging viruses are not just mutations, but actually man made . The implications of this, of course means that we need to be extremely aware of how we can protect ourselves naturally from this type of thing. If we can incorporate specific foods and herbs into our everyday diet, this gives us a better chance of fighting whatever comes our way.





Now that we have had a brief look at the origin of these emerging viruses, it is time to examine what is important – curing them . Most people will automatically think of traditional, man-made medication, but this guide will demonstrate how herbal, more natural medication has extensive benefits of its own.

Respiratory Infections – such as the influenza virus – are believed to be one of the main reasons that people visit their doctor or pharmacist. According to the NHS , health professionals make the following differentiation:

Infections of the Upper Respiratory Tract – this affects the nose, sinuses and throat.

Infections of the Lower Respiratory Tract – this affects the airways and lungs.





These viruses can spread in many different ways, most primarily through the air. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, droplets of the disease can then be breathed in by someone else. The only way to attempt to prevent this from happening, is by practicing good hygiene.

When suffering an upper respiratory infection, most people chose to treat them at home – which is the best thing to do unless the symptoms continue to worsen or you have underlying health problems. Rest and hydration are key factors in this.

Of course, there are other medical ways these symptoms can be treated – or at least alleviated. The most common of these include:

Acetaminophen – (Tylenol) to reduce fever and body aches.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs – (Ibuprofen) can be used for body aches and fever.

Antihistamines – (Benadryl) can help with nasal congestion.

Antitussives – (Cough Medication) can be used to help with the cough.

Steroids – (Decadron) can be used to reduce inflammation in the airway passage.

Decongestants – (Sudafed) are also good for nasal congestion.

Antibiotics – in some cases, antibiotics will be prescribed.



But there are also many natural remedies that can help reduce these symptoms ; honey , liquorice root and Thyme to name a few. These natural solutions will be examined further throughout this guide.





Watch video on Respiratory Infections





Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain which is usually caused by a viral infection (very often it is the herpes simplex virus), but can also be the result of an insect bite. The symptoms of this are usually aching muscles, fever, headaches, fatigue, and nausea – all the common signs that link to a virus. This can often make it very difficult to diagnose which means victims can slip into a coma. The long lasting results of this can range from nothing, all the way to permanent brain damage. A few of these issues can include:

Problems with balance, co-ordination and dexterity.

Speech problems.

Weakness and problems with movement.

Swallowing problems.

Seizures (fits).

Chronic headache.

Personality changes.

Memory problems.

Behavioral problems.

Mood problems, anxiety and depression.

Difficulty concentrating.





JEV = Japanese Encephalitis Virus .

Encephalitis isn’t a very common disease, with approximately only 2,500 people being affected per year in the UK and Ireland. Although anyone can catch it, the very young, the very old and people who have had their immune system compromised (for instance; HIV sufferers or people undergoing cancer treatment) are most at risk.

After Encephalitis has been diagnosed using a Lumbar Puncture (or spinal tap) or Electroencephalograph which dictates unusual brain waves, then, the antiviral medication Aciclovir is traditionally prescribed to assist your body in battling the virus. Doctors will also combine this with ‘supportive treatments’ such as intravenous fluids to help your body rest and fight.

Although you must be treated by a qualified medical doctor for Encephalitis, there are natural remedies that you can use to alleviate the symptoms and strengthen your immune system. These include:

Green Tea – 250–500mg daily. This antioxidant may help lower inflammation and boost your immune system.

Cat’s Claw – 20mg three times a day. This herb may lower inflammation and fight viruses.

Garlic – 400mg two to three times a day. Garlic is brilliant for boosting your immune system.

Astragalus – 250–500mg four times a day. Great for boost your immune system and fighting viruses.

Elderberry – One or two spoonfuls of standardized liquid extract two to four times a day. Great for boosting your immune system and fighting viruses.



These natural remedies are discussed in more detail later in this guide. It is important to remember to check with you doctor before using any of these herbs as they may interfere with your current medication.

Watch video on Encephalitis





As stated earlier in this chapter, HIV – Human Immunodeficiency Virus – is currently one of the biggest emerging viruses that has caused an epidemic. It is a condition in humans which causes the immune system to progressively fail.



Although there is currently no cure for HIV, there are antiretroviral medications that have been specifically designed to stop the virus replicating the body. They allow the body to repair itself and prevent further damage. There are possible side effects to this medication; nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, sleep difficulties, etc, but the medication taken can be rearranged to change this.

Alongside the medication, doctors will recommend that HIV sufferers exercise, eat well, don’t drink or smoke and have a yearly flu jab to give their immune system the best chance possible.

There have also been a wide range of studies into the possibility of help from more natural, herbal remedies. A 2013 study published in the ‘African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine’ has made the claim that Black Seed Extract (Nigella Sativa ) used by a HIV patient resulted in a full recovery , leaving them with no detectable HIV antibodies:

“Nigella sativa has been documented to possess many therapeutic functions in medicine but the least expected is sero-reversion in HIV infection which is very rare despite extensive therapy with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART).”



Other more natural remedies have been used by HIV patients to strengthen their immune systems, provide relief from the side effects from the traditional medicine and give them a better quality of life. These include:

Immune System Therapies – designed to support the immune system. These include ashwagandha, astragalus, atractylodes, cat’s claw, ginseng, greater celandine, shatvari, shiitake, maitake mushrooms.

Antimicrobial Therapies – designed to kill bacteria, viruses and fungi. These include garlic, goldenseal, neem, propolis, sanguinaria, tea tree.

Antioxidants – prevent the damage caused by our body’s natural processes. These include ginger, ginkgo, milk thistle, turmeric.

HIV Related Conditions – there are some conditions caused by HIV. These natural remedies are used to combat them:



Ginkgo to prevent HIV-related dementia.

St. John’s wort for mild to moderate depression.

Greater celandine for Kaposi’s sarcoma.

Marijuana for wasting.

Aloe vera for skin problems.

Lemon balm for insomnia and herpes simplex.



General Well-Being – sometimes the herbs are used just to make HIV sufferers feel a little better. These can include ashwagandha, ginseng, shatvari.



Watch Natural Cures and Treatments for HIV





Ebola is another recent emergent virus discussed in this chapter. This disease has a very high death rate, killing approximately 50% of its sufferers. The symptoms include fever, rash, sore throat, muscle pain, headaches. This all happens before the kidney and liver function of victims begins to decrease.



At this current time, the Ebola virus is a very new outbreak, and there aren’t any licensed treatments or vaccines available, although they are being worked on. However, there are treatments being used; such as blood products, immune therapies and drug therapies.

There were two outbreaks of the Ebola virus in 1976, in Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo simultaneously. The newest outbreak which was first noted in March 2014, is much larger and much more of a threat. The most severely affected countries are Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, which are all lacking any resources due to recent periods of conflict and instability. The virus is spread by direct human contact and bodily fluids so anyone suspected of suffering from the virus must be placed in isolated quarantine to prevent it from spreading any further.

Ebola Data :





According to some sources , magnesium salts, sodium bicarbonate, iodine, selenium and vitamin C, are the key to resolving Ebola.

These more natural remedies have been proven in tests and studies to help the human body fight and defend itself against other viral infections – which suggests that they stand a very good chance at helping the victims of the Ebola Virus.

Watch video on Natural Remedies for Ebola





The lifecycle of a virus is as follows:

A virus particle attaches to a host cell. This is called the process of adsorption .

The particle injects its DNA or RNA into the host cell called entry .

The invading DNA or RNA takes over the cell and recruits the host’s enzymes.

The cellular enzymes start making new virus particles called replication .

The particles of the virus created by the cell come together to form new viruses. This is called assembly .

The newly formed viruses kill the cell so that they may break free and search for a new host cell. This is called release .



The key to any emerging virus is to find a way to cure it before it becomes an epidemic. As shown by the current examples of these – in particular HIV and Ebola – it is virtually impossible to do this as it takes years of study, testing and quality control to get these medications on the market, and even then they often provide undesirable side effects. Herbal remedies give sufferers an immediately available alternative to this, which should be considered by doctors and patients.





CHAPTER 2


EYE-OPENING ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE STATISTICS


NCCAM – the National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine – is the federal government led agency that conducts scientific research for alternative medicine. They have conducted a lot of research into the usage of complementary and alternative medicine.

The diagrams below show the findings of this data (CAM = Complementary and Alternative Medicine ):





From this data, it’s easy to see the benefits of herbal medication and why more people are turning to it on an annual basis. The NCCAM data below shows the age range of people using complementary and alternative medicine, and due to all the information shown so far, this is due to continue to grow dramatically.



Watch the following video on Complementary and Alternative Medicine





CHAPTER 3


USAGE OF ANTIVIRALS – ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW




There are many reasons why people make the change to herbal medication, and in particular antivirals, but of course, you need to be sure that the choice is right for you. A study shows that nearly one third of Americans already use herbal remedies and intend to continue to do so, but everyone needs to take the following conditions into consideration :

Other medication that you are taking – you will need to consult with your doctor to check that there will be no negative interactions.

Side effects – although herbal medication has much less possibilities of side effects than conventional antibiotics, you still need to be aware of what could occur.

Regulation – herbal medication isn’t regulated in the way that conventional treatments are. There are a lot of resources and information available for you to make your own decisions, but there are a few groups that haven’t been properly tested on – women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, children or the elderly. It is always best to consult with your doctor first.



A virus is described as:

“A ny of a large group of submicroscopic infective agents that are regarded either as extremely simple microorganisms or as extremely complex molecules, that typically contain a protein coat surrounding an RNA or DNA core of genetic material but no semipermeable membrane, that are capable of growth and multiplication only in living cells, and that cause various important diseases in humans, animals, or plants.”

A virus is not considered as ‘live’ as it cannot replicate outside of a host. Viruses enter and infect cells before using them to replicate and mutate, which can eventually kill the cells. An example of this is the influenza virus which attacks the respiratory system.



It’s difficult to produce prescription antiviral medication that is safe and effective without damaging the cell that the virus has used to replicate. The first experimental antivirals were developed in the 1960’s through trial-and-error discovery methods, targeting the herpes virus initially. It wasn’t until the 1980’s, when the full genetic sequences of viruses were understood that scientists could work out the right chemicals needed to thwart their reproductive cycle.

“Antiviral medicines work by biochemically making it impossible for the virus to replicate” explains Randy Wexler, MD, assistant professor of family medicine at the Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus.

Below is a list of the most commonly prescribed antiviral medications :





The Way H erbal Antivirals Work

One such way is the disruption of the replication cycle. Another way that “antivirals” are said to work is by stimulating the immune system. Antivirals can bind to certain enzymes and prevent adsorption into the host cell.

Michael Moore, a herbalist, describes antivirals in his Medical Glossary as:

“An agent that experimentally inhibits the proliferation and viability of infectious viruses. In our domain of herbal medicines, some plants will slow or inhibit the adsorption or random initial attachment of viruses, extend the lifespan of infected target cells, or speed up several aspects of immunity, including complement, antibody, and phagocytosis responses. Herbal antivirals work best on respiratory viruses such as influenza, adenoviruses, rhinoviruses, and the enteric echoviruses. Touted as useful in the alphabet group of slow viruses (HIV, EBV, CMV, etc.), they really help to limit secondary concurrent respiratory infections that often accompany immunosuppression.”

Of course, there are pros and cons to both traditional and herbal antivirals . These are examined below:





Traditional Antivirals


Pros:

They help you get over the viral infection faster.

They are easy to take – often coming in the form of tablets or capsules.

Traditional medication is regulated by a governing body to ensure its safety.



Cons:

Side effects include nausea, vomiting, cough, runny/stuffy nose, diarrhea.

They aren’t essential. You will recover from the viral infection without them.





Herbal Antivirals


Pros:

Herbal antivirals offer far fewer side effects.

They cost much less...

and are far more easily available.



Cons:

There is a lack of regulation in herbal antivirals which means it can be more difficult to find all the information you need.

They can interact with other medication you’re taking.

Watch video on Natural Antiviral Herbs





There are many ways that your body can fight infections and strengthen your immune system naturally – it is designed to do so. Sometimes it just needs a little help when it comes to viruses. Aside from herbal medication, there are factors that you can include in your everyday lifestyle as preventative methods:

Don’t smoke.

Eat a healthy diet – fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low saturated fats.

Exercise regularly.

Maintain a healthy weight.

Control your blood pressure.

If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation.

Get adequate sleep.

Take steps to avoid infection – wash your hands frequently, cook meats thoroughly, etc.

Get regular medical screening tests suitable for your age range and risk group.



Watch Natural Ways to Boost your Immune System

There are many essential oils that contain antiviral properties .

The following 5 are the most popular: Clove , Oregano , Basil , Cinnamon and Peppermint .





CHAPTER 4


BEST SOURCES FOR HERBAL ANTIVIRALS




Herbal antivirals can be found everywhere. They don’t necessarily have to be purchased in supplement form. In fact, including antiviral food in your everyday diet is a great way to help prevent viruses from affecting you.

These are considered to be the Top natural antivirals in food, herbs and spices as:

Cat’s Claw

Cranberry

Eld e rberry

Ginger

Lemon Balm

Liquorice Root

Olive Leaf

Ore g ano



These are suggested to be the best antiviral herbs :

Turmeric

Cinnamon

Garlic

Oregano

Rosemary

Gin g er

Peppermint

Basil



Watch video on Natural Antiviral Food & Herbs





CHAPTER 5


TOP 45 ANTIVIRAL HERBS


1. Garlic




Garlic has been cultivated for more than 5000 years and has been prized for its medicinal properties since the days of the pharaohs. It is used as a folk remedy in many cultures to protect against colds and influenza. In laboratory studies, garlic was found to possess antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties. Key to garlic’s antiviral and healing properties are its hundreds of beneficial compounds, which work synergistically. The most significant of these is allicin, which produces garlic’s pungent odour. It is produced from another compound, alliin, when fresh garlic is cut or chewed and it can also be obtained from powdered garlic supplements with allicin potential. Allicin in turn produces other sulphur compounds, such as ajoene, allyl sulphides and vinyldithiins. Aged garlic products lack allicin, but may have some antiviral activity due to the presence of Sallylcysteine. Garlic’s cold-preventing reputation has been upheld by laboratory tests in which fresh garlic, allicin and various other sulphur compounds in garlic killed the common cold virus, various strains of influenza viruses and herpes simplex virus types I and II.

Availability: Can be purchased from most food-based shops. (e.g. Nature’s Best , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Allicin is the most powerful antiviral compound in garlic. This sulphur compound is primarily used to fight the cold virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as powder, tablets, capsules or can be consumed in food (preferably raw).

Dosage: 2-5g.

Possible Side Effects: The smell can often lead to bad breath, heart burn and upset stomach.

Contraindications: Do not take if allergic to garlic or if pregnant or breastfeeding.

Alternatives: All close relatives of onions and garlic including shallots, leeks, chive and rakkyo.

Other Uses: Blood pressure, digestion, stomach ulcers, cancer, blood clotting, impotence, antiseptic, etc.



Watch the following video on The Health Benefits of Garlic





2. Echinacea




Echinacea is one of the top-selling herbal remedies throughout the world. It is also one of the oldest. Not only has this healing herb enjoyed long popularity, it also has been the subject of much scientific research. Echinacea is known to support the immune system and may also have direct antiviral action. Preparations of Echinacea roots and flowering parts have been shown in several clinical trials to be effective in reducing the severity and duration of symptoms in patients with common cold, upper respiratory tract infection and viral bronchitis symptoms. The natural antivirals described in this article may provide a welcome (and sometimes more effective) alternative to pharmaceutical drugs. Because some of them have been shown to kill viruses only in the test tube and have not yet been subject to clinical trials, the best approach to take in treating viral illnesses may be a holistic one. This would involve the use of several antiviral products together with immune-boosting nutrients such as vitamins A, C and E, zinc, selenium, CoQ10 and probiotics.

Availability: From most good herbal remedy shops (e.g. A. Vogel , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Polysaccharides, glycoproteins, alkamides, volatile oils and flavonoids. An immunostimulant which helps the body boost its immune system. Echinacea is primarily used for viral bronchitis .

Collection & Preparation: Can be taken as a herb juice, a freeze-dried capsule or a tablet. You can also make a tea by drying the roots out for two weeks and brew it with 8 ounces of water.

Dosage: Juice 6-9ml for 8 weeks, capsule 100mg three times a day, tablet 6.78mg three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Itchiness or a rash.

Contraindications: Do not take if suffering with auto-immune disorders such as MS.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Influenza, urinal tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, genital herpes, gum disease, acne, psoriasis, sinus infections, etc.

Watch Echinacea Herb Health Benefits





3. Astragalus




Astragalus is also called huang qi or milk vetch . It comes from a type of bean or legume. While there are multiple species of astragalus, most astragalus supplements contain astragalus membranaceus. The herb is said to offer multiple health benefits for multiple conditions, including heart benefits.

Astragalus appears to work by stimulating the immune system. It has antioxidant effects that inhibit free radical production. In the body, free radicals damage cells and are linked to many health problems associated with aging.

Availability: Most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Natures Remedy , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Polysaccharides, choline, betaine, rumatakenin, [beta]-sitosterol. Astragalus has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for years because it’s an adaptogen which means that it’s great for helping the body against physical, mental and emotional stress. It is primarily used for the Human papillomavirus (HPV) virus which causes warts .

Collection & Preparation: It is available as a tablet or capsule. The root needs to be dried. Can also be made into a tea by mixing 3–6oz of dried root in 12oz of water.

Dosage: 200mg twice a day. Tea can be taken three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Can make your immune system more active, so will have an impact on those who suffer from an auto-immune disease.

Contraindications: Do not use if pregnant or breast feeding, also avoid if you suffer from blood disorders.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Dietary supplements, colds, cancer, HIV, aids, energy levels, diarrhea, etc.

Watch the following video on Astragalus Root Benefits





4. Cat’s Claw




A new botanical nutrient, Uncaria Tomentosa , is being called by many the “Miracle Herb from the Rain Forest of Peru”. It has been drawing increasingly more interest among the proponents of natural health care. Although virtually unheard of in the United States until recently, the beneficial effects of the Peruvian herb Uncaria tomentosa, commonly known as “una de gato” in Spanish and “cat’s claw” in English, have been studied at research facilities in Peru, Austria, Germany, England, Hungary and Italy, since the 1970’s. These studies suggest that the herb may be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, bursitis, allergies, diabetes, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, cancer, herpes, organic depression, menstrual irregularities and disorders of the stomach and intestines.

Availability: Most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Quinovic Acid Glycosides, which work to protect the body’s immune system. Cat’s Claw is primarily used for the herpes virus .

Collection & Preparation: It is available as a tea – by crushing the vines and mixing them with boiling water, capsule or tincture forms.

Dosage: 60–100mg per day.

Possible Side Effects: Headaches, dizziness and vomiting.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from low blood pressure, leukaemia or auto-immune diseases.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Digestive problems, colitis, anti-inflammatory, fungal issues, Crohn’s disease, etc.

Watch the following video on Cat’s Claw





5. Elderberry




The common black elderberry (Sambucus nigra ) has long been used as a food and is also one of nature’s oldest remedies. It appears to be particularly effective against the influenza virus. In an independent study conducted in Norway, elderberry extract was shown to significantly reduce the duration of influenza symptoms by approximately four days.

Elderberry extract is believed to act by binding to, and so disarming, the tiny protein spikes on the surface of the virus, by which it penetrates living cells. Flavonoids, including quercetin, may also be involved in the therapeutic actions of elderberry according to other studies. These flavonoids include anthocyans that are powerful antioxidants and protect cells against damage. The activity of elderberry against other viral infections, including HIV and herpes, has also been studied. It was found to significantly reduce the infectivity of HIV strains in laboratory tests and to completely inhibit the replication of four strains of herpes simplex virus, including two strains resistant to the drug acyclovir.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Lewtress , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Flavanoids – including quercetin, which coats viruses and prevents them from penetrating and infecting healthy cells. Elderberries are primarily used against the influenza virus .

Collection & Preparation: Can be taken as a juice or used in your food. You can also buy Elderberry liquid capsules.

Dosage: Take the juice extracts for no longer than 12 weeks or 15ml four times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Nausea, vomiting and severe diarrhea.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from auto-immune diseases.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Reduces cancer cell formation, antioxidant, protects blood vessels, etc.



Watch the following video on Elderberry Health Benefits





6. Lemon Balm




Lemon balm is a member of the mint family and is considered a calming herb. This herb is also known as Melissa officinalis , and it has been used for centuries to reduce anxiety, promote sleep and improve symptoms of indigestion. Lemon balm has been researched by experts and found to offer many great health benefits.

Lemon balm is native to Europe but is commonly grown all over the world. It is often grown in herb gardens to attract bees which help pollinate the rest of the garden. The plant grows up to two feet and has light yellow flowers that grow where the leaves meet the stem. The leaves are similar in shape to mint leaves and have a tart and sweet smell like lemons.

This herb has been used by the ancient Greeks and Romans to treat insect bites and stings. The leaves give off a strong tart smell that insects do not like. The insect-repellent essential oils it contains include citronella and monoterpenaldehydes citral A and B. The essential oils that are released from the leaves are also used to treat insomnia, nervousness and anxiety.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy and health food stores. (e.g. iHerb , Natures Remedy , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Terpenes, tannins and eugenol which have a strong calming and antiviral effect. Lemon balm is primarily used for the herpes virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a capsule or can be made into a tea by mixing 1oz of fresh lemon balm leaves with boiling water.

Dosage: 80mg per day, for no longer than four months.

Possible Side Effects: Abdominal pain, dizziness, wheezing.

Contraindications: Do not allow children under the age of 12 to take.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Anxiety, sleep problems, restlessness, high blood pressure, insect bites, etc.

Watch the following video on How to Make your Own Lemon Balm Tincture





7. Liquorice Root




Liquorice root is the root and underground stems of an herbaceous perennial plant Glycyrrhiza glabra. Greek, Egyptians, Chinese and other Asian nations have been using Licorice root for flavoring, confectionery applications and medicinal purposes for centuries. It is also known as sweet root and Gan Zao in Chinese. Licorice Root contains a number of healthy compounds such as flavonoids, volatile oils, plant sterols, coumarins, glycosides, asparagine, chalcones, glycyrrhizic acid and anethole. Licorice Root has a peculiar sweet flavor with a faint hint of anise flavor and is sweeter than sugar (sucrose).

Licorice has been used for flavoring and sweetness in candies but recently has been replaced with Anise. It is still used as a sweetener in herbal medicines, lozenges/herbal cough candies, and tobacco products. However, studies suggest that along with its a slew of health benefits a key compound in Licorice Root, glycyrrhizic acid, may raise blood pressure levels when used in large quantities on regular basis. Therefore, processed Licorice Root is also available that does not contain glycyrrhizic acid and can be found under the label of Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice Root (DGL root).

Availability: Most good herbal remedy and health food shops. (e.g. Amazon , Holland and Barrett )

Antiviral Properties: Flavonoids, volatile oils, plant sterols, coumarins, glycosides, asparagine, chalcones, glycyrrhizic acid and anethole. Liquorice root is primarily used for viral hepatitis .

Collection & Preparation: Can be prepared in food or bought in medicinal tincture form.

Dosage: 1ml three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: High blood pressure, low potassium levels, fatigue, water and sodium retention.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from high blood pressure, hormone sensitive conditions, kidney disease, hypertonia or are pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: St. Johns Wort.

Other Uses: Lower cholesterol, ulcers, skin disorders, liver problems, etc.

Watch the following video on Herb Liquorice or Liquorice Root





8. Olive Leaf




Olive leaf extracts can be a powerful health tonic to destroy bacteria and boost immunity. According to a study done by the scientists from Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Israel, olive leaves practically kill almost all bacteria, including Candida albicans and E coli. Research that followed the Israel study also favored the same results underscoring olive leaf’s potential as an immune-booster. The olive tree and its leaves are popular for its ability to resist infections, attacks by microbes and insects. With years of research scientists have now isolated the unique molecule, oleuropein responsible for the anti-bacterial effects of olive leaves.

Availability: Most good herbal remedy and health food shops. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Olea europaea which blocks viral cell repetition and works to reduce fevers. Olive leaf is primarily used to fight the influenza virus .

Collection & Preparation: Can be consumed with food (olive oil) or purchased as a liquid extract.

Dosage: Liquid extract 30ml per day or with food 30–40g.

Possible Side Effects: Can affect respiration allergies.

Contraindications: Do not use if pregnant, breast feeding or suffer from diabetes.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: High blood pressure, insect bites, cancer, age-related diseases, arthritis, etc.

Watch the following video on the Medicinal Uses of Olive Leaf





9. Black Seed




This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells with the diabetic’s pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists. The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa , have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial. While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.

The earliest record of its cultivation and use come from ancient Egypt. Black seed oil, in fact, was found in Egyptian pharoah Tutankhamun’s tomb, dating back to approximately 3,300 years ago. In Arabic cultures, black cumin is so known as Habbatul barakah, meaning the “seed of blessing.” It is also believed that the Islamic prophet Mohammed said of it that it is “a remedy for all diseases except death.”

Availability: In most good herbal remedy and health food shops. (e.g. iHerb , Amazing Herbs , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Thymoquinone, thymohydroquinone, dithymoquinone, thymol, carvacrol, nigellicine and alpha-hedrin – all of which work towards boosting your immune system. Black seed is mostly known for its work in HIV treatment. It is also used for pain relief.

Collection & Preparation: Mix the oil with another liquid, such as juice or yogurt. The seeds must be heated.

Dosage: 3 teaspoons per day.

Possible Side Effects: Do not take if pregnant – black seed can prevent the uterus from contracting.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from bleeding disorders, diabetes or low blood pressure.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Headaches, constipation, combating the side effects of chemotherapy, etc.

Watch the following video on Black Seed Oil





10. Green Tea




Green tea (Camellia sinensis ) has been considered a medicinal remedy in Chinese tradition for over 4000 years and its many health benefits have recently been validated by scientific methods. Green tea contains a group of flavonoids called catechins, which appear to inhibit viral infections by binding to the haemagglutinin of the influenza virus and so preventing the virus from entering the host cells. Research in China has shown that green tea extract and isolated catechin derivatives also act by blocking the viral enzymes reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase which allow viruses to replicate. The green tea compounds tested were effective in inhibiting HIV, herpes simplex and hepatitis B virus. So far, no clinical studies have been carried out to further explore green tea’s potential as a treatment for influenza and other viral diseases.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores

Antiviral Properties: Catechins which inhibit viral infections by binding the haemagglutinin, preventing it from infecting healthy cells. Green tea is primarily used to prevent the influenza virus from spreading further.

Collection & Preparation: Available as tea leaves or tea bags. Brew the tea by mixing 20z of leaves with 6oz of water. Green tea is also available as a capsule or tablet to be taken 3–4 times daily.

Dosage: No more than 5 cups a day.

Possible Side Effects: Headaches, nervousness, sleep problems, dizziness and irritability.

Contraindications: Do not use if pregnant or breast feeding or suffer from blood pressure issues.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Cancer, weight loss, cholesterol, Alzheimer’s, etc.

Watch the following video on Green Tea’s Anti-Inflammatory Effects





11. Ashwagandha




For centuries, Ayurvedic medicine has used the ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) plant as an aphrodisiac, to remedy general weakness and exhaustion, as well as for its stress-relieving qualities. In Ayurveda, certain herbal formulas are considered to be rejuvenating. These formulas are called Rasáyana tonics, and they are typically taken over long periods of time to regenerate both brain and body tissue. In rare cases an herb is so potent and has so many health benefits that Ayurveda considers it to be a Rasáyana therapy on its own.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Steroidal actones and alkaloids which works to rejuvenate the body and mind. Ashwagandha is primarily used to fight viral infections and repair the body afterwards .

Collection & Preparation: Traditionally, ashwagandha is taken in a powder form. A level teaspoon of the powder of the herb can be boiled in a cup of milk for ten minutes over a low flame and then taken with a teaspoon of a natural sugar (like honey) and a quarter-teaspoon of a spice like cinnamon or ginger. A half-teaspoon of clarified butter (ghee) can be added to enhance the herb’s effect.

Dosage: Twice a day from one to three months.

Possible Side Effects: Stomach upset, diarrhea and vomiting.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from diabetes, blood pressure issues, stomach ulcers or auto-immune diseases.

Alternatives: Shatavari.

Other Uses: Stress, fatigue, lack of concentration, stabilizes blood sugar, lower cholesterol, etc.

Watch the following video on Top 5 Benefits of Ashwagandha





12. Ginseng




There are three different herbs commonly referred to as ‘ginseng’: Asian or Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) , American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) , and Siberian ginseng. The latter herb, although it shares many of the properties of the first two, is not a true ginseng.

In traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Panax ginseng was used to strengthen the digestion and the lungs, calm the spirit, and increase overall energy. It is considered to be an adaptogen, helping to balance the body and strengthen it under whatever stressful circumstances it encounter. It is widely used in energy drinks and supplements that support vitality, mental alertness and sports performance. Ginseng has been reported to have anticancer, anti-inflammatory abilities. But there is also evidence that Panax can help support immunity, especially with regard to colds and flu.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Simply Supplements , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Ginsenosides, which works on many of the areas the body and helps improve the body’s resistance to stress and increases vitality. Ginseng is primarily used to fight influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a capsule or tablet.

Dosage: 2g daily and don’t take for longer than three months at a time.

Possible Side Effects: Nervousness, insomnia, headaches and stomach upset.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from diabetes or are on warfarin or antidepressants.

Alternatives: Rhodiola.

Other Uses: Stress, fatigue, to increase energy levels, etc.

Watch video on Health Benefits of Ginseng





13. Ginkgo Biloba




Ginkgo biloba, also known as Maidenhair , has been traced back nearly 300 million years making it the oldest surviving tree species on earth. The Chinese have used the plant medicinally for eons but many of the modern applications come from the research of German scientists. Ginkgo is a prescription herb in Germany.

Ginkgo extract has proven benefits to elderly persons. This ancient herb acts to enhance oxygen utilization and thus improves memory, concentration, and other mental faculties. The herbal extract has also been shown to significantly improve long-distance vision and may reverse damage to the retina of the eye. Studies have also confirmed its value in the treatment of depression in elderly persons. The ginkgo extract may provide relief for persons with headache, sinusitis, and vertigo. It may also help relieve chronic ringing in the ears known as tinnitus.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Woods Supplements , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Terpenoids and flavanoids which improve blood circulation and kill bacteria. Ginkgo Biloba is primarily used to fight the influenza virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available in capsule and tablet form.

Dosage: 120–240mg per day. The dosage depends on the illness you are trying to combat.

Possible Side Effects: Stomach upset, headache, dizziness, constipation, forceful heartbeat, and allergic skin reactions.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from diabetes, seizures, infertility, bleeding disorders or for children.

Alternatives: Propolis.

Other Uses: Dementia, Lyme disease, vertigo, mood disturbances, Raynaud’s syndrome, etc.

Watch the following video on Ginkgo Biloba Health Benefits





14. Colloidal Silver




Colloidal silver, which is a colloid consisting of silver particles suspended in liquid, and formulations containing silver salts were used by physicians in the early 20th century, but their use was largely discontinued in the 1940s following the development of safer and effective modern antibiotics and antivirals. Since the 1990s, colloidal silver has again been marketed as an alternative medicine, often with extensive “cure-all” claims. Colloidal silver products remain available in many countries as dietary supplements and homeopathic remedies.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon , Higher Nature ).

Antiviral Properties: Nanosilver has a toxicity to bacterial and viral pathogens. They prevent viruses from infecting healthy cells. Colloidal Silver is primarily used to fight the HIV virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a spray, a tonic, drops, or used in a nebulizer.

Dosage: One ounce during a 24 hour period.

Possible Side Effects: If taken incorrectly, Colloidal Silver can impact on your internal organs, and give your kin a blue-ish tint.

Contraindications: Do not take when pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Ear infections, weight loss, gonorrhea, ringworm, psoriasis, influenza, etc.

Watch: The Internal Benefits Colloidal Silver





15. Zinc




Zinc has become a popular treatment for the common cold. Doctor says taking zinc syrup, tablets or lozenges may be an effective treatment for colds. A 2011 Cochrane review suggests that taking zinc supplements within a day of the symptoms starting will speed up recovery and lessen the severity of symptoms.

Doctors may recommend zinc supplements for people who have zinc deficiencies. Strict vegetarians, breastfeeding women, alcohol abusers and people who have a poor diet are at higher risk of zinc deficiency, as are those with certain digestive problems, such as Crohn’s disease.

Availability: Available in most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iherb , Amazon , My Protein ).

Antiviral Properties: Pyrithione and hinokitiol. Zinc inhibits the rhinovirus replication making it primarily used for the herpes simplex virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tablet or capsule.

Dosage: Do not take more than 40mg per day.

Possible Side Effects: Coughing, stomach pain, fatigue.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from diabetes, haemodialysis, arthritis or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Macular degeneration, ADHD, head injuries, weight gain, osteoporosis, etc.

Watch video on Zinc and Health





16. Pau D’arco




Pau d’arco is a tree with extremely hard wood. Its name is the Portuguese word for “bow stick,” an appropriate term considering the tree’s use by the native South American Indians for making hunting bows. The bark and wood are used to make medicine.

Native to South America, Pau d’arco (Tabebuia avellanedae ), has been used in herbal medicine with a wide range of health concerns, including pain, arthritis, inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis), fever, dysentery, boils and ulcers, and various cancers. Other names for Pau d’arco include Ipe roxo , LaPacho, Tabebuia avellanedae and Taheboo tree . Even as early as 1873, there are reports of medicinal uses of Pau d’arco.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Naphthoquinones: lapachol and beta-lapachone. Pau d’arco is primarily used for viral gastroenteritis .

Collection & Preparation: Available as tablets, capsules, powder, tincture or a tea. The tea is made by boiling one teaspoon of the powder in boiling water for 5–15 minutes.

Dosage: No more than 2g per day.

Possible Side Effects: Nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, internal bleeding.

Contraindications: Do not take if suffering from bleeding disorders, or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Bronchitis, stomach inflammation, joint pain, boils, wounds, etc.

Watch Pau D’arco Herb Health Benefits and Side Effects





17. St. John’s Wort




St John’s wort is a herbal remedy also known as hypericum. It is extracted from the flowers and leaves of the plant Hypericum perforatum and has been used over many centuries as a traditional medicine for wound healing and mental health problems. It remains popular with the public, bought over-the-counter from health food shops and chemists as a treatment for depression. However, it should strictly be considered a drug since it contains pharmacologically active agents, including hypericin. SJW’s mechanism of action is unknown but it may inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline, inhibit monoamine oxidase, up-regulate serotonin receptors, and decrease serotonin receptor expression.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Naphthodianthrones (hypericin, pseudohypericin, protohypericin, protopseudohypericin, and cyclopseudohypericin), flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, and luteolin), hyperforin, several amino acids, and tannins. St John’s Wort is primarily used for hepatitis B and herpes .

Collection & Preparation: Available as tablets, liquid extract or tea. The tea is made by mixing 1–2 teaspoons of the herb with boiling water.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 300mg three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Dry mouth, sensitivity to sunlight, dizziness, stomach upset.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re using birth control pills, blood thinners or cancer drugs.

Alternatives: Liquorice root.

Other Uses: Depression, anxiety disorders.

Watch Benefits of St. Johns Wort





18. Cordyceps




Cordyceps is not your typical friendly grocery store mushroom. It’s a fungus that attaches itself to a caterpillar and uses the carcass as food. It then shoots out Medusa-like stems that yield spores looking for their own hosts. In a way, it‘s both a fungus and a caterpillar, because the caterpillar plays an important role in the end product. Cordyceps grows in the higher altitudes of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau, and has been prized as a medicine for centuries in Tibet and China. Although it was used to treat a number of ailments, Cordyceps was also highly regarded as an aphrodisiac. Because of its astronomical cost, it was used only by the very wealthy.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Gratefulgoose , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Nucleosides, sterides, polysaccharides, proteins, essential amino acids. Cordyceps are primarily used for the hepatitis B virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tablet, capsule or to eat in food.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 5–10g daily.

Possible Side Effects: Sickness, stomach upset.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from auto-immune disorders, bleeding disorders or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: Other varieties of mushrooms.

Other Uses: Kidney disorders, anemia, irregular heartbeat, weakness, weight loss, etc.

Watch The Amazing Health Benefits of Cordyceps





19. Rhodiola




Rhodiola rosea is a remarkable herb that has a wide and varied history of uses. It is thought to strengthen the nervous system, fight depression, enhance immunity, elevate the capacity for exercise, enhance memory, aid weight reduction, increase sexual function and improve energy levels. It has long been known as a potent adaptogen. Adaptogens are substances that increase the body’s overall resistance and help to normalize bodily functions.

Rhodiola has a legendary history dating back thousands of years. In 77 A.D., the Greek physician Dioscorides documented the medical applications of the plant, which he then called rodia riza, in his classic medical text De Materia Medica. The Vikings depended on the herb to enhance their physical strength and endurance, while Chinese emperors sent expeditions to Siberia to bring back “the golden root” for medicinal preparations. The people of central Asia considered a tea brewed from Rhodiola rosea to be the most effective treatment for cold and flu. Mongolian physicians prescribed it for tuberculosis and cancer.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Pureclinika , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Salidroside. Rhodiola is an adaptogen that works primarily to combat stress in the body and fight off the common cold .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tablet, capsule or tincture.

Dosage: No more than 600mg per day. Do not take for longer than 10 weeks at a time.

Possible Side Effects: Anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, nausea.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Increasing energy, high cholesterol, depression, diabetes, etc.

Watch video on Rhodiola





20. Boneset




The herb Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum ) has a long history of being used effectively in cases of influenza and fever. Native Americans also used boneset in the treatment of aches and pains of the structural system and in the healing of bones that had been broken. Many of the early uses of boneset were in the form of poultices or topical plasters. Taking the herb in the form of an infusion or tea did not become popular until around the mid-1900s.

The herb`s common name of boneset was derived from its ability to break the terrible fevers associated with influenza. These fevers were such in their severity that they were described as going to the bone or as bone fever. Writing of boneset, Dr. Edward E Shook, N.D., DC, pointed out the amazing success of the herb as it was used very successfully in the United States for the treatment of influenza, a disease which killed some 6-8 million people during the First World War

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Calcium, magnesium, PABA, potassium, and vitamins C and B-complex. Boneset is primarily used to treat the influenza virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tincture or tea. The tea can be made by mixing one ounce of leaves with boiling water.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 2g of leaves and flowers.

Possible Side Effects: Liver damage, vomiting, stomach upset.

Contraindications: Do not take if you have an allergy to ragweed, if you suffer from liver disease or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Joint pain, fluid retention, increase sweat and urine output, fever, etc.

Watch Boneset Herb Benefits





21. Eleuthero




Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus ), also known as eleuthero, has been used for centuries in Eastern countries, including China and Russia. Despite its name, it is completely different from American (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng), and has different active chemical components. The active ingredients in Siberian ginseng, called eleutherosides, are thought to stimulate the immune system.

Siberian ginseng was traditionally used to prevent colds and flu and to increase energy, longevity, and vitality. It is widely used in Russia as an “adaptogen.” An adaptogen is a substance that is supposed to help the body better cope with either mental or physical stress.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores (e.g. Naturesremedy , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Polysaccharides which increases the body’s production of interferon. Eleuthero is primarily used for the herpes simplex virus , but it also works to boost the immune system, helping the body fight the cold and flu virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tablet or capsule.

Dosage: 400mg per day for viral infections.

Possible Side Effects: Drowsiness, depressions, anxiety, muscle spasms, changes in heart pace.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from bleeding disorders, diabetes, heart conditions, hormone sensitive conditions, high blood pressure or mental conditions.

Alternatives: Other ginseng products.

Other Uses: High blood pressure, kidney disease, diabetes, insomnia, arthritis, etc.

Watch video on Eleuthero





22. Red Root




Red root as a medicinal plant is powerful, yet underutilized. It can be found in the 1898 edition of King’s American Dispensatory with good representation, but many other Eclectic texts on herbal medicine display little or no notice of it. It wasn’t considered powerful or useful until the mid 1900’s. The plant has been misrepresented due to a lack of therapeutic evidence. The lack could come as a result of the part of the plant being used -mostly the leaves – which were not near as powerful as the root and very different in action. Another factor may also be that the importance of a certain organ system’s major role in function and disease, namely the spleen/lymphatic system, went unrecognized in Western medicine for so long.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Gratefulgoose , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Tannins, triterpenes, flavanoids and ceanothine. Red root is primarily used for the treatment of asthma, bronchitis and coughs .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tincture or a capsule. Red root can also be made into a tea by adding the dried root powder to boiling water for 10–15 minutes.

Dosage: 1 teaspoon 3–4 times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, insomnia, irregular heartbeats, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re using iron supplements, blood thinners, if you are pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: Ceanothus ovalis.

Other Uses: Dental care, fever, gonorrhea, insomnia, dysentery, etc.

Watch video on Redroot





23. Reishi




The water-soluble polysaccharides, beta-glucans and hetero-beta-glucans, are active ingredients found in the red reishi mushroom, which is the highest-quality form you can get. These polysaccharides boost the immune system, fight tumours and lower blood pressure. Reishi also contains the ling zhi-8 protein, which boosts the immune system, too. Supplementing with reishi is considered to be very safe, but patients undergoing organ transplants or using immunosuppressive drugs should be careful because any immune-modulating substance can interact adversely.

Availability: In most good heath food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Polysaccharide, which helps protect damaged cells. Reishi mushrooms are primarily used to fight viral gastroenteritis and bronchitis .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an extract or to be used in food.

Dosage: 6–12g per day.

Possible Side Effects: Dryness of the mouth, throat, and nasal area along with itchiness, stomach upset, nosebleed, and bloody stools.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re suffering from bleeding disorders, low blood pressure, thrombocytopenia or if you are pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: Other mushroom products.

Other Uses: High cholesterol, kidney disease, sickness, fatigue, high blood pressure, etc.

Watch Health Benefits of Reishi Mushroom





24. Turmeric




Turmeric is the root stalk of a tropical plant that’s part of the ginger family. One of the main components of the spice is a substance called curcumin which has potentially healing properties. Turmeric has been used for many thousands of years in Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicine for conditions including heartburn, diarrhea, stomach bloating, colds, fibromyalgia and depression.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Curcumin which interferes with the reproduction of viral cells. Turmeric is primarily used for the herpes simplex virus and HIV .

Collection & Preparation: Available as tablets or a spice to use with food.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 500mg four times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Stomach upset, nausea, dizziness, or diarrhea.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from gallbladder problems, bleeding disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hormone sensitive conditions, infertility or iron deficiency.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Arthritis, heart burn, liver problems, headaches, ringworm, skin conditions, etc.

Watch Health Benefits of Turmeric





25. Rosemary




Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ) is widely used as a spice when cooking, especially in Mediterranean dishes. It is also used for its fragrance in soaps and other cosmetics. Traditionally, rosemary has been used medicinally to improve memory, relieve muscle pain and spasm, stimulate hair growth, and support the circulatory and nervous systems. It is also believed to increase menstrual flow, act as an abortifacient (causing miscarriage), increase urine flow, and treat indigestion. Almost none of these uses have been studied scientifically in humans. However, one study in humans found that long term daily intake of rosemary prevents thrombosis.

In the lab, rosemary has been shown to have antioxidant properties. Antioxidants can neutralize harmful particles in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Also in the lab, rosemary oil appears to have antimicrobial properties (killing some bacteria and fungi in test tubes). It isn’t known whether rosemary would have the same effect in humans.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid which boost the body’s immune system and help fight off viral infections. Rosemary is primarily used to fight influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil or a leaf which can be used in food or to make a tea. The tea is made by mixing fresh or dried leaves with boiling water for 10–15 minutes.

Dosage: The leaf standard dosage is 4–6g per day. The oil is recommended at 0.1–1ml.

Possible Side Effects: Vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney discomfort, skin sensitivity.

Contraindications: Do not take if you have an allergy to aspirin, suffer from bleeding disorders or if you’re pregnant of breast feeding.

Alternatives: Other members of the mint family.

Other Uses: Digestive problems, high blood pressure, gallbladder complaints, hair growth, etc.

Watch The Amazing Health Benefits of Rosemary





26. Peppermint




Peppermint (Mentha piperita ), a popular flavoring for gum, toothpaste, and tea, is also used to soothe an upset stomach or to aid digestion. Because it has a calming and numbing effect, it has been used to treat headaches, skin irritations, anxiety associated with depression, nausea, diarrhea, menstrual cramps, and flatulence. It is also an ingredient in chest rubs, used to treat symptoms of the common cold. In test tubes, peppermint kills some types of bacteria, fungus, and viruses, suggesting it may have antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. Several studies support the use of peppermint for indigestion and irritable bowel syndrome.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Tannins and polyphenols which work to fight off viral infections. Peppermint is primarily used for treating chickenpox and similar viral conditions .

Collection & Preparation: Available as tablets, an oil or as a tea. The tea can be made by blending the leaves with hot water for 5 minutes.

Dosage: Tablets = 90mg per day, oil = 8ml mixed with 100ml of water.

Possible Side Effects: Heartburn, flushing, headaches, and mouth sores.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re suffering from diarrhea or achlorhydria.

Alternatives: Other plants in the mint family such as Lemon Balm.

Other Uses: Sinus infections, heartburn, nausea, pain, menstrual problems, stomach problems, etc.

Watch video on Health Benefits of Peppermint





27. Coriander




Coriander is a small, hollow-stemmed plant in the Apiaceae family, in the genus: Coriandum. Its scientific name is Coriandum sativum . Pleasant, aromatic and spicy, its seeds have been in use since ancient times in cooking as well as an ingredient in various traditional medicines.

Coriander is native to Southeastern Europe and grown extensively all over Europe, Middle East, China, India, and Turkey. It is recognized as cilantro in the west. This herbaceous plant grows up to 2 feet in height with branching stems, featuring deep green soft, hairless, bi or tri-lobed leaves. The mature plant bears small light pink color flowers that subsequently turn into globular or oval-shaped fruits (seeds). The seeds measure about 4-6 mm in diameter with central hollow cavity containing two vertical vittae containing some important essential oils.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Gratefulgoose , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Monoterpenes, which fights viral cells. Coriander is primarily used for assistance with the common cold .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tincture, in food or an infusion. The infusion can be made by mixing 150ml of boiling water with powdered coriander.

Dosage: The infusion can be taken before meals. The recommended dosage for the tincture is 10–20 drops

Possible Side Effects: Increased sensitivity to sunlight, diarrhea, stomach pain, darkened skin, depression, lapse of menstruation, and dehydration.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from diabetes, low blood pressure, or if you are allergic to mugwort, aniseed, caraway, fennel, or dill.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Upset stomach, haemorrhoids, toothaches, joint pain, bowel spasms, etc.

Watch video on Coriander Benefits





28. Sarsaparilla




Sarsaparilla is a natural herb that has been used by many individuals in connection with liver disease and syphilis. However, it is most commonly used in connection with eczema, psoriasis, and other skin disorders.

Sarsaparilla is native to South America, Latin America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean and was introduced to Europe in the late 15th century. Unlike the sarsaparilla tree which is primarily found in the Northern hemisphere, sarsaparilla is a vine-like plant that has wood-like stems and long thorns. Sarsaparilla was exported to Europe before 1530 from Mexico. It was used in the sixteenth-century for syphilis and rheumatism. Sarsaparilla was used in the 1850s for syphilis in the U. S. Pharmacopoeia. Sarsaparilla products were promoted as blood purifiers, tonics, diuretics, sweat inducers, and for many other applications and was often used in patent medicines. With claims implying it contains testosterone, sarsaparilla has been used as a male sexual rejuvenator and an anabolic steroid replacement in natural body-building formulas.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Sarsasapogenin, sitosterol, stigmasterol, and pollinastanol and flavonoids. Sarsaparilla is primarily used to treat the herpes simplex virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as capsules an extract or a tea. The tea is made by mixing 1–2 teaspoons of the powdered root to boiling water.

Dosage: No more than 2g per day.

Possible Side Effects: Stomach irritation.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from asthma, kidney disease or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Syphilis, rheumatoid arthritis, skin conditions, digestive disorders, etc.

Watch video about Sarsaparilla Root





29. Flaxseed




The seeds from the flax plant can be used whole, ground to make meal or used to create a vegetable oil known as flaxseed oil (or linseed oil). Flaxseed is one of the most concentrated plant sources of omega-3 fats. Flaxseeds contain 50 to 60 per cent omega-3 fatty acids in the form of alpha linolenic acid. Flaxseeds are also rich in antioxidants, B vitamins, dietary fibre, a group of phytoestrogens called lignans, protein and potassium.

The seeds’ high fibre content is beneficial for heart health, and the fact that they are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids can help lower blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Findings published in the American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition found that the seeds (not the oil) can reduce total and LDL (bad) cholesterol by a significant amount, particularly in post-menopausal women. A study published in the Journal Of Clinical Oncology found that ground flaxseeds slow the growth of prostate cancer tumor.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Simply Supplements , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Lignans, which protect healthy cells from viral infections. Flaxseed oil is primarily used for upper respiratory tract infections .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil or as seeds to eat.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 40–50g per day.

Possible Side Effects: Bloating, gas, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, nausea.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re suffering from bleeding disorders, diabetes, hormone sensitive conditions, hypertriglyceridemia or blood pressure issues.

Alternatives: Other seed products.

Other Uses: Coronary heart disease, colon damage, bladder infections, depression, etc.

Watch Health Benefits of Flaxseed





30. Basil




The king of herbs basil herb is one of the oldest and popular herbal plants brimming with notable health-benefiting phytonutrients. This highly prized plant is revered as “holy herb” in many traditions all around the world. Basil belongs to the family of Lamiaceae, in the genus: Ocimum. Its scientific name is “Ocimum basilicum” .

Basil is originally native to Iran, India and other tropical regions of Asia. This bushy annual herb is especially grown for its medicinally useful leaves and seeds. Basil grows best under warm, tropical climates. Fully-grown plant reaches on an average about 100 cm in height. Its leaves are light green, silky about 2.5 inches long and 1 inch broad with opposite arrangement. The flowers are quite large, white or purple, arranged in terminal spikes.

Varieties of basil herb exist. “Mediterranean” cultivar which is typically known as sweet basil, has light green leaves as opposite to “Asian basil” (Ocinum sanctum) that features large, hairy stems and stalks with pink flowers, purple or red leaves in addition to possessing stronger ‘clove’ like flavor. There is also lemon basil, which has “lemon” flavor. Thai basil (O. basilicum ‘Horapha’) is similar in characteristics to Asian basil but features narrow, pointed, light green color leaves with a sweet licorice like aroma.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Ursolic acid which coats viral cells. Basil is primarily used for viral hepatitis .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil or can be used as a herb with food.

Dosage: No more than 200ml per day for two months.

Possible Side Effects: Low blood pressure.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from bleeding disorders.

Alternatives: Other similar herbs, such as Thyme.

Other Uses: Hair loss, fluid retention, kidney conditions, warts, worm infections, etc.

Watch Basil Benefits





31. Betony




Wood Betony is a healing herb for many ailments. This perennial herb belongs to the family Labiatae and is known for being tall. It can grow up to 70cm tall and contains numerous bright purple flowers, which grow in clusters of up to 15, on the very end of the upright, thick green stem. Modern herbalists prescribe betony to treat anxiety, gallstones, heartburn, high blood pressure, migraine and neuralgia, and to prevent sweating. It can also be used as an ointment for cuts and sores.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Tannins, flavonoid glycosides and stachydrine. Betony is primarily used to fight the influenza virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tincture or tea. Can be made into a tea by mixing 1–2 teaspoons of the dried root with boiling water.

Dosage: 2–6ml three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Stomach upset.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from low blood pressure or if you’re pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: Other herbs from the mint family, such as Sage.

Other Uses: Asthma, digestive problems, intestinal gas, bladder and kidney stones, etc.

Watch Betony Herb Health Benefits





32. Cardamom




Cardamom is a seed pod, known since centuries for its culinary and medicinal properties. The spice is native to evergreen rain forest of southern India and grown in only few tropical countries. Botanically, it belongs to the family of “Zingiberaceae” and consists of two genera; Elettaria and Amomum.

Generally, the plant grows up to 4 meters in length in thick clumps and starts bearing its prized seed pods soon after about two years of plantation. Each pod measures about 1-2 cm in length.

Both Elettaria and Amomum cardamom types feature three-sided pods with a thin, yet tough papery outer cover. Inside, tiny, deep-brown to black, aromatic seeds are arranged in vertical rows with each grain ensheathed by a very thin membrane. Elettaria pods are small and light green, while amomum pods are larger and dark brown. The pods are being used as flavoring base in both food and drink as well as in medicine.

Black cardamom (Amomum subulatum) also known as Nepal cardamom (bari or kali elaichi) is relatively big sized pod of same Zingiberaceae family. The pod has dark brown, rough outer coat, measuring about 2-4 cm in length and 1-2 cm in diameter. The pods have camphor-like intense flavor commonly used in spicy stews in sub Himalayan plains of India, Pakistan, Nepal as well as in China.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Mountainroseherbs , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Terpenes which prevent viral cells from reproducing. Cardamom is primarily used to fight off influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil, powder or as food.

Dosage: The standard dosage is 1.5g per day.

Possible Side Effects: Chest pains, throat tightness, shortness of breath.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re suffering from gallstones or if you are pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: Nutmeg.

Other Uses: Colic, IBS, constipation, liver problems, bronchitis, heartburn, etc.

Watch Cardamom Herb Health Benefits





33. Chamomile




The term Chamomile actually refers to a range of different daisy-like plants, which are a member of the Asteraceae family. There are many different species of chamomile, the two most commonly being German chamomile (Marticaria recutita ) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile ). They have been used since Ancient times for their calming and anti-inflammatory properties, and each offer their own additional health benefits.

Chamomile is an age-old medicinal herb known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Chamomile’s popularity grew throughout the Middle Ages when people turned to it as a remedy for numerous medical complaints including asthma, colic, fevers, inflammations, nausea, nervous complaints, children’s ailments, skin diseases and cancer. As a popular remedy, it may be thought of as the European counterpart of the Chinese tonic Ginseng.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Naturesremedy , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Terpenoids, flavanoids, coumarins all which reduce stress in the body. Chamomile is primarily used for chickenpox and other similar skin viral conditions .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a capsule, a cream or a tea. The tea can be made by stewing chamomile flowers in boiling water for 5–10 minutes.

Dosage: The standard capsule dosage is between 400 and 1,600mg per day. It is recommended to drink between one and four cups of chamomile tea per day.

Possible Side Effects: Drowsiness.

Contraindications: Do not take if you’re using sedatives, blood thinners or pain killers.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Insomnia, heartburn, digestive disorders, vomiting, colic, skin conditions, etc.

Watch Chamomile Tea Benefits





34. Cinnamon




Cinnamon is gathered from the dried inner bark of the branches of a small, tropical, evergreen laurel tree. The bark is peeled off and, as the pieces are dried, they curl up into quills. These are the common cinnamon sticks that are used in herb teas and for baking.

In Chinese medicine, cinnamon is one of the most widely used “warming” herbs that aid in circulation and digestion. It is a common ingredient in tea used for nausea in pregnancy and also following the baby’s delivery to decrease haemorrhage. Cinnamon raises vitality, warm the system, stimulates all of the body’s vital organs, counteracts congestion, improves digestion, relieves abdominal spasms and aids in peripheral circulation.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Healthspan , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Volatile oils which prevent viral cells from reproducing. Cinnamon is primarily used to fight influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Can be taken as juice, powder or prepared with food. Also can be bought as tablets and capsules.

Dosage: 1–6g per day for no longer than 6 weeks.

Possible Side Effects: Increased heart rate and palpitations.

Contraindications: Do not take if using blood-thinners such as Warfarin.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Improving glucose and lipid levels, HIV, multiple sclerosis, etc.

Watch The Amazing Health Benefits of Cinnamon





35. Clove




Cloves are one of the highly prized spices, widely recognized all over the world for their medicinal and culinary qualities. They are the “flower buds” from evergreen rain-forest tree native to Indonesia.

Botanically, the spice belongs to the family of Myrtaceae of the genus; Sygyzium, and scientifically named as Sygizium aromaticum . The flower buds are initially pale in color, gradually turn to green, and, finally develop into bright-red clove buds by the time of harvesting. Buds are generally picked up when they reach 1.5-2 cm in length.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Newwayherbs , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Carvacrol, thymol, eugenol and cinnamaldehyde. Clove’s are primarily used to fight the common cold.

Collection & Preparation: Buy whole cloves rather than powder, store them in a cool, dark place and cook them within your food. Also available as an oil.

Dosage: 15–30 drops of the oil three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Vomiting, dizziness, diarrhoea and bloating.

Contraindications: Do not use if allergic to eugenol, suffer from Crohn’s disease or have liver problems.

Alternatives: Basil, marjoram, cinnamon.

Other Uses: Digestion issues, lack of appetite, travel sickness, respiration diseases etc.



Watch Clove – Herbal Medicinal Properties





36. Oregon Grape Root




Oregon grape can help the healing of those with chronic and acute urinary tract infections, skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis, acne and cold sores.

The time for harvesting the root and stems is fall/winter/early spring, after the berries fall off and before the new leaves emerge. This ensures that the energy, or medicine of the plant is concentrated down below the soil line. The stems and roots can be scraped of their medicinal bark and either used fresh for tinctures or dried for later infusions.

Availability: Available in most good herbal remedy shops. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Isoquinline alkaloids berberine and hydrasine. Oregon Grape Root is primarily used for cytomegalovirus, human papillomavirus and the herpes simplex virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a cream or capsules. Can also be made into a tea by simmering 1–2 teaspoons of coarsely cut root for 10–15 minutes.

Dosage: Take for no longer than a week, leaving at least a 7 day break.

Possible Side Effects: Can cause jaundice and kernicterus in children.

Contraindications: Do not take while pregnant or suffering from diarrhoea.

Alternatives: Berberry, coptis, goldenseal.

Other Uses: Stomach ulcers, psoriasis, reflux, etc.

Watch Oregon Grape – Where to Find it, How to Use it





37. Ginger




Used for at least two thousand years in China as a remedy for upset stomachs, Ginger’s history in Asian cuisine actually goes back at least five thousand years.

In more modern times, it was believed by Europeans to have come directly from the Garden of Eden, while the first American settlers used it to make beer. These days, Ginger is still used by many herbologists to cure digestive problems, but it has also had success in treating the common cold, motion sickness and arthritis.

Availability: In most good health food and herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Naturesbest , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Rhizome and flavanoids which protect healthy cells, preventing virus reproduction. Ginger is primarily used to fight off influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Can be bought as food, drink, sweets, capsules and tablets. Ginger can be made into a tea by mixing a tablespoon of fresh grated ginger with boiling water.

Dosage: Capsules or tablets – 250mg four times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Heart burn, stomach discomfort, extra menstrual bleeding.

Contraindications: Do not take if using warfarin, diabetes medication, heart medication or asprin.

Alternatives: Honey.

Other Uses: Cancer, diabetics, ulcers, gastric distress, inflammation, radiation, high blood pressure, nausea, etc.



Watch How to Make Fresh Ginger Tea – Nature’s Antibiotic





38. Oregano




Oregano is a wonderful herb, both to use in your cooking and to use therapeutically as needed. Its name means “mountain joy” and oregano was revered as a symbol of happiness by the ancient Greeks and Romans. This is why drawings often depict brides and grooms of the time crowned with a laurel of oregano, which was a widespread tradition.

Although oregano is popular in Mediterranean cuisine, in the US, it’s often associated primarily with a pizza spice. This does this medicinal herb a great disservice, since today we know that oregano contains vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium. Additionally, oregano, which is sometimes called “wild marjoram” in Europe (and is closely related to the herb sweet marjoram) contains potent phytochemicals that provide potential health benefits.

Availability: Most good herbal remedy and health food shops. (e.g. Puritan , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Terpenes and thymol which fight off viral infections. Oregano is primarily used for respiratory tract infections .

Collection & Preparation: It can be used in food, or bought an oil or a cream.

Dosage: 200mg three times daily for no longer than six weeks.

Possible Side Effects: Can cause a reaction if you’re allergic to plants in the Lamaiceae family.

Contraindications: Do not take if you suffer from bleeding disorders or diabetes.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Muscle pain, athlete’s foot, dandruff, earaches, influenza, acne, varicose veins, etc.

Watch Medicinal Uses of Oregano





39. Acacia




Acacia trees have been known for thousands of years for their extremely strong wood, their medicinal properties and decorative uses. Hebrews considered acacia to be a sacred wood and there is even a legend according to which Christ’s crown of thorns was made of acacia.

Nowadays, acacia has become increasingly popular for its therapeutic properties and numerous herbalists recommend it as a natural remedy against a wide variety of disorders.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Staphylococcus, which fights viral cells. Acacia is primarily used to cure human papillomavirus .

Collection & Preparation: Available in as seeds, honey and a gum which needs to be combined with water to work successfully.

Dosage: 30g daily for 6 weeks.

Possible Side Effects: Gas, bloating, nausea and loose stools.

Contraindications: Do not take if pregnant or breast feeding.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Weight loss aid, throat and stomach inflammation, etc.

Click here for 7 uses of Acacia





40. Goldenseal




Goldenseal has been used throughout history as a medicinal herb, partly because of its amazing ability to stimulate the body’s own immunity. The bushy plant typically grows wild in rich soils and has beautiful bright yellow flowers that produce gorgeous red oil when infused. Goldenseal is now an endangered species due to excessive wild harvesting.

Goldenseal is also known to have powerful antiviral effects which make it popular used internally against colds and flu. It is also commonly used to help with cold sores and herpes lesions when made into a tea and used as a gargle or topical wash. Goldenseal has the added benefit of being known for boosting the body’s own immunity, which makes it a great help in colds and flu.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Berberine and isoquinoline alkaloids which work to inhibit viral cells. Goldenseal primarily fights influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tablet, capsule, extract or tincture.

Dosage: 0.5 to 1 gram tablets or capsules, 0.3 to 1 milliliter of liquid/fluid extract or 2 to 4 milliliters as a tincture – all taken three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Numbness, sickness, diarrhea.

Contraindications: Do not use if pregnant, breast feeding or in newborn babies.

Alternatives: Oregon Grape Root.

Other Uses: Eczema, hay fever, hemorrhoids, chronic fatigue, liver problems, etc.

Watch All About Goldenseal Root





41. Juniper




The natural antibacterial, antiviral, diuretic, and antiseptic properties of Juniper (Juniperus communis ) lend themselves well to treatment of a variety of internal and external conditions. Historically, it served as a treatment against infectious diseases as well as an aid for childbirth.

Juniper is an evergreen tree that grows wild throughout parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. Though there are many varieties of juniper, the most common in North America is the Juniperus communis. This particular tree grows up to 10 feet tall and has needle-like leaves and seed cones. The medicinal parts of the juniper tree are known as berries but are actually the dark blue-black scales that come from the cones. Scales from the male juniper ripen in 18 months while Scales from the female juniper ripen within 2 to 3 years.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Natures Sunshine , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Amentoflavone which prevent viral cells from reproducing. Juniper is primarily used for viral gastroenteritis .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil, or as berries which can be used in food.

Dosage: 20–100mg of the essential oil, 2–10g of the berries.

Possible Side Effects: Skin and respiratory allergic reactions can occur.

Contraindications: Do not use if pregnant or breast feeding, do not use if you suffer from diabetes, stomach and intestinal disorders or blood pressure issues.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Heartburn, indigestion, urinary tract infections, kidney and bladder stones, etc.

Watch Juniper Berry Fruits Health Benefits





42. Sage




Sage is a herb native to the Mediterranean, belonging to the Lamiaceae (the mint) family along with other herbs, such as oregano, lavender, rosemary, thyme, and basil. The herb has gray leaves up to 2.5 in long (6.4 cm) and flowers that are usually blue, purple, white or pink. Because of its unique pleasant aroma sage is often used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Sage is used in medicine to help alleviate symptoms of digestive problems and mental disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and depression.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Healthspan , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Tannins and flavanoids which inhibit viral cells. Sage is primarily used for influenza, but is extremely beneficial in fighting the herpes simplex virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a capsule, cream or a herb for food. Can be made into a tea by placing a teaspoon of powdered or fresh sage in boiling water. Can be made into a tonic by pouring a quart of boiling water over a handful of leaves and leave it to stew overnight.

Dosage: 1–2.5g three times a day.

Possible Side Effects: Restlessness, irritability, headaches, stomach upset and dizziness.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from diabetes, high blood pressure or seizure disorders.

Alternatives: Rosemary.

Other Uses: Stomach pain, menopause side effects, bloating, memory loss, overproduction of saliva, etc.

Watch Health Benefits of Sage





43. Greater Celandine




Chelidonium majus , or greater celandine, has a long history of use in many European countries. Ancient Greeks, Pliny the Elder and Dioscorides all called celandine an effective detoxifying agent. The Romans used celandine as a blood cleanser. The French herbalist Maurice Mességué cited celandine tea for help with liver problems. Its use also extends to traditional Chinese medicine, and it’s become an important part of western phytotherapy. Extracts of greater celandine have exhibited a broad spectrum of toxicity to harmful organisms as well as liver protecting activity. This has led to the inclusion of greater celandine in liver and gallbladder cleansing and support protocols.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Alkanoids and flavanoids which work to fight and kill viral cells. Greater celandine is primarily used to fight off influenza .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a cream or a tincture. The roots are used to create this medicine.

Dosage: The cream can be applied as needed. The tincture = 1ml three times a day for four weeks.

Possible Side Effects: The cream can cause a skin rash.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from auto-immune diseases, liver disease, hepatitis or if you have a bile duct blockage.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: High blood pressure, warts, IBS, constipation, menstrual cramps, pain, etc.

Watch Celandine Herb Benefits





44. Neem




The ancient Neem tree of Asia has been the source of natural medicinal extracts for thousands of years. Indian history documents farmers having purposefully tended to and harvested Neem trees for their beneficial uses as far back as the Vedic period, 1500-600 B.C. Until recent history, the Neem has been used internally and externally in the traditional Ayurvedic herbal healing treatments in India. The last half century has seen the expansion of this herbal product into other parts of the world where European and American scientists have begun studies on the potential medical benefits of Neem.

With a history that spans from the beginning of Hinduism through the modern era, the Neem tree has proven itself to be a valuable herbal aid for daily living and for the support of ailments and irritants. As more studies are done with positive results and more people learn about Neem, its uses will become more a part of many individuals’ daily health regiments.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. Theneemteam , iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Polyphenolics such as flavonoids and their glycosides, dihydrochalcone, coumarin and tannins which interact with the surface of the viral cells to stop them reproducing. Neem is primarily used for the herpes and hepatitis viruses .

Collection & Preparation: Available as an oil, extract, tincture, capsules and tea – by mixing the leaves with boiling water.

Dosage: Capsules = 1–2 twice a day and oil/tincture = 5 drops daily.

Possible Side Effects: If taken for a long period of time, it can harm your kidneys and liver.

Contraindications: Do not use if you are trying to conceive, or suffer from auto-immune disorders, diabetes or have had an organ transplant.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Leprosy, dandruff, eye disorders, gum disease, hemorrhoids, blood vessels, etc.

Watch Wonder Herb – Neem





45. Sanguinaria (Bloodroot)




Sanguinarine is a plant alkaloid present in the root of Sanguinaria canadensis and Poppy fumaria species. It is a cationic molecule which converts from an iminium ion form at pH less than 6 to an alkanolamine form at pH greater than 7. Sanguinarine and a few other alkaloids constitute the active ingredients of most sanguinaria extracts.

Sanguinarine has been shown to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. It has been used as an antiseptic mouth rinse and a toothpaste additive to reduce dental plaque and gingival inflammation. Sanguinarine is found to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid, collagen, U46619 and sub-threshold concentration of thrombin.

Availability: In most good herbal remedy stores. (e.g. iHerb , Amazon )

Antiviral Properties: Alkaloids sanguinarine and berbine which kills off viral cells. Sanguinarine is primarily used to fight the HIV virus .

Collection & Preparation: Available as a tincture, a powder, toothpaste and a fluid.

Dosage: Tincture = 11/2 teaspoons, powder = 1 grain and fluid = 10–30 drops daily.

Possible Side Effects: Nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, low blood pressure.

Contraindications: Do not use if you suffer from intestinal problems or glaucoma.

Alternatives: N/A.

Other Uses: Croup, nasal polyps, achy joints, gum disease, poor circulation, etc.

Watch video for Plant Portrait – Bloodroot





CHAPTER 6


LITTLE KNOWN HERBAL REMEDY RECIPES


There are many antiviral recipes that you can create in your own home. Here are some brilliant ones that are easy to create and work to fight the symptoms of influenza :

1. Ginger, garlic and onion soup - for the common cold .



1/3 cup each of chopped ginger, garlic and onion

2 cups of pure water



Mix together and boil on a high heat for 20 minutes, before simmering for another 10. Strain to complete the soup. Drink this as often as you like.





2. Cinnamon and Elderberry soup – for bronchitis .



1 cup of elderberries

1 cup of organic honey

1 cinnamon stick

5 cloves

1 star anise (obtained from the star shaped Illicium Verum fruit found in China)

1 teaspoon of orange, lemon or lime zest

1/3 cup of grated organic ginger

2 cups of water



Simmer all ingredients in a small pan for 40 minutes until the liquid is well reduced. Once you have strained the liquid, and whilst it’s all warm stir in the honey. Take a teaspoon of this every morning and night until you feel better.





3. ‘The Master Tonic’ – for influenza .



1 cup of fresh chopped garlic

1 cup of fresh chopped onion

1 cup of fresh grated ginger root

1 cup of fresh grated horseradish root

1 cup of chopped fresh cayenne peppers

Raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar



Mix the chopped vegetables and grated herbs together and then top it with the apple cider vinegar. Shake this tonic for at least once a day for two weeks before consuming and then drink two or more times daily (1 or 2 ounces) until you’re well. For infections – dose must be taken 5-6 times a day. It is safe during pregnancy and for children (in small doses).





4. Basic Cold & Flu Tea – for cold and flu symptoms .



3 – 4 slices of ginger with skin

1 clove of chopped garlic

Cayenne powder

Tea (black, oolong, green...your choice)

Honey

Milk



Bring 3 – 4 slices of fresh ginger (skin on) and one clove of chopped garlic to a boil and simmer for approximately 20 minutes. Use ginger water to steep tea and add cayenne powder as hot as can be tolerated to induce sweating. Add honey and milk to your personal preferred taste. Drink 3-4 cups per day and before bed and bundle up to induce sweat.





5. Garlic Lemonade – for influenza .



2 – 4 chopped garlic cloves

3 – 4 slices of chopped ginger

2 – 3 lemons

Honey

Water



In a 1 quart mason jar combine 2 – 4 cloves chopped garlic and 3 – 4 slices of fresh ginger.

Cover and let steep for at least 20 minutes. Add juice of 2-3 lemons and honey to taste (approximately 1/4 cup). You can strain or leave herbs in mixture. Consume warm and as needed. It can be consumed at room temperature, but not chilled.





6. Lemon Balm Home Remedy – for cold sores and herpes virus.



2 lemon balm teabags or 2 teaspoons of dried lemon balm

1 cup of boiling water



Steep the lemon balm in the boiling water for 10 – 15 minutes before straining. Saturate a cotton ball in the mixture before dabbing it onto the cold sore at least 4 times a day. You can also drink a few cups of lemon balm tea a day to help eliminate the virus from your body.





7. Onion and Honey Cough Medicine – for coughs .



1 cup of fresh chopped onion

Half cup of raw honey

Optional for added flavor 1-2 tablespoons of: cloves, ginger, marshmallow root.



Put chopped onions and any herbs of choice into a small stainless steel or glass pot. Add enough honey to cover the onions.

Turn the pot on low heat and slowly simmer. The honey will soften and you want to keep the temperature very low while allowing the herbs to steep in the honey. It’s best to keep a lid on to help keep all of the medicinal properties of the herbs in the syrup, and just take the lid off to give it a quick stir every few minutes to ensure it doesn’t burn at all.

Give it 20 minutes of simmering, then remove it from the heat. Strain the onions and herbs out and store the remaining honey (which might have flecks of herb in it and this is fine) in a small glass jar with a lid and keep it in the fridge. This can be taken as often as necessary (1tsp. for children and 1 tbsp. for anyone above 10 years).





8. Neem Recipe – for chickenpox



Neem leaves

Water



Prepare a paste of neem leaves by crushing them with water. Apply this neem paste onto the skin of the patient. Once the disease is cured and the scabs have dropped off the skin, give the patient neem bath. For this, soak neem leaves in warm water and bath with this water.

Watch video for more Herbal Remedy Recipes





CHAPTER 7


HERBAL REMEDIES FOR COMMON AILMENTS





SOURCES





FAQ


1. Which is the best medical option for treating chronic hepatitis B?

According to this source the following drugs as approved for hepatitis B treatment in the US:



Herbal remedies that work well for chronic hepatitis B and the symptoms include:

Ne e m

Flax s eed

Turmeric

Liquorice Root



2. Do herbal treatments of HIV actually work?

There have been many studies into the effect of herbal treatments, in particular Black Seed , with very positive results. Of course, you will need to consult your doctor to ensure that none of the herbal remedies will affect your traditional medication, but as with any illness, it cannot hurt to strengthen your immune system and give your body at better chance at fighting off infection.

3. What is the best herbal treatment for throat infection?

Many herbal remedies work to fight the symptoms of influenza, in particular sore throats. The following are considered to be amongst the most successful:

Honey

Lemon

Echinacea

Garlic

Zinc



4. Can you take Goldenseal without interfering with the antibiotics?

It is always advisable to check with your doctor before taking any herbal remedy to ensure it doesn’t interact with any medication you are taking. A study conducted by the University of Maryland, suggests that Goldenseal may a