Main Your Office: Getting Started with Project Management Using Microsoft® Project 2016

Your Office: Getting Started with Project Management Using Microsoft® Project 2016

The Your Office series provides the foundation for students to learn real world problem
solving for use in business and beyond. Students are exposed to hands-on technical content
that is woven into realistic business scenarios and focuses on using Microsoft Office
as a decision-making tool.
Year: 2016
Edition: 1
Publisher: Pearson Education
Language: english
Pages: 157
ISBN 13: 978-0-13-432080-9
File: PDF, 90.40 MB
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GETTING STARTED WITH

Project
Management
Using Microsoft Project ™ 2016

Series Editor

AMY KINSER

KRISTYN A. JACOBSON

ISBN-13: 978-0-13-448092-3
ISBN-10:
0-13-448092-9

9 0 0 0 0

www.pearsonhighered.com

9

780134 480923

Getting Started with Project Management
Using Microsoft® Project 2016
Second Edition
Amy Kinser
Kristyn A. Jacobson

Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Amsterdam Cape Town
Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montréal Toronto Delhi Mexico City
São Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo

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Editorial Director: Andrew Gilfillan
Senior Portfolio Manager: Samantha McAfee Lewis
Team Lead, Project Management: Laura Burgess
Project Manager: Anne Garcia
Development Editor: Vonda Keator, Keator & Pen
Portfolio Management Assistant: Michael Campbell
Director of Product Marketing: Maggie Waples
Director of Field Marketing: Leigh Ann Sims
Product Marketing Manager: Kaylee Carlson
Field Marketing Managers: Joanna Conley & Molly Schmidt
Marketing Assistant: Kelli Fisher
Senior Operations Specialist: Maura Zaldivar-Garcia
Senior Art Director: Mary Siener

Manager, Permissions: Gina Cheselka
Interior and Cover Design: Studio Montage
Cover Photo: Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock
Associate Director of Design: Blair Brown
MyLab Product Model Manager: Eric Hakanson
Vice President, Product Management, MyLab: Jason Fournier
Digital Product Manager: Heather Darby
Media Project Manager, Production: John Cassar
Full-Service Project Management: Cenveo Publisher Services
Composition: Cenveo Publisher Services
Chapter Opener Images: art_of_sun/shutterstock

Credits and acknowledgments borrowed from other sources and reproduced, with permission, in this textbook appear on appropriate page within text.
Microsoft and/or its respective suppliers make no representations about the suitability of the information contained in the documents and related graphics published
as part of the services for any purpose. All such documents and related graphics are provided “as is” without warranty of any kind. Microsoft and/or its respective
suppliers hereby disclaim all warranties and conditions with regard to this information, including all warranties and conditions of merchantability, whether express,
implied or statutory, fitness for a particular purpose, title and non-infringement. In no event shall Microsoft and/or its respective suppliers be liable for any special,
indirect or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting from loss of use, data or profits, whether in an action of contract, negligence or other tortious action, arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of information available from the services.
The documents and related graphics contained herein could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically added to the information herein. Microsoft and/or its respective suppliers may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described herein at any time.
Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and other countries. This book is not sponsored or endorsed by or
affiliated with the Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright © 2017 by Pearson Education, Inc., New York, NY 10013. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This publication is protected by
Copyright and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by
any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. For information regarding permission(s), write to: Rights and Permissions Department.
Pearson Prentice Hall™ is a trademark of Pearson Education, Inc.
Pearson® is a registered trademark of Pearson plc
Prentice Hall® is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, Inc.
Pearson Education Ltd., London
Pearson Education Singapore, Pte. Ltd
Pearson Education, Canada, Inc.
Pearson Education–Japan

Pearson Education Australia PTY, Limited
Pearson Education North Asia Ltd., Hong Kong
Pearson Educación de Mexico, S.A. de C.V.
Pearson Education Malaysia, Pte. Ltd.

Names: Kinser, Amy, author. | Jacobson, Kristyn A., author.
Title: Your office getting started with project management using microsoft(r) project 2016 / Amy Kinser, Kristyn A. Jacobson.
Description: Hoboken : Pearson, [2016]
Identifiers: LCCN 2016048316 | ISBN 0134480929
Subjects: LCSH: Microsoft Project. | Project management--Computer programs.
Classification: LCC HD69.P75 K564 2016 | DDC 658.4/04028553--dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016048316

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
ISBN-10: 0134480929
ISBN-13: 9780134480923

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Dedications
I dedicate this series to my Kinser Boyz for their unwavering love, support, and
patience; to my parents and sister for their love; to my students for inspiring me; to
Sam for believing in me; and to the instructors I hope this series will inspire!
Amy S. Kinser
I dedicate this book to my loving parents, Jeron and Ranee’, for their unending
support, guidance, and encouragement.
Kristyn A. Jacobson

About the Authors
Amy S. Kinser, Esq., Series Editor
Amy holds a B.A. degree in Chemistry with a Business minor from Indiana University
and a J.D. from the Maurer School of Law, also at Indiana University. After working as an environmental chemist, starting her own technology consulting company,
and practicing intellectual property law, she has spent the past 15 years teaching
technology at the Kelley School of Business in Bloomington, Indiana. Currently, she
serves as the Director of Computer Skills and Senior Lecturer at the Kelley School
of Business at Indiana University. She also loves spending time with her two sons,
Aidan and J. Matthew, and her husband J. Eric.

Kristyn A. Jacobson
Kristyn holds an M.S. in Education from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and
a B.S. in Business Education from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. She has
been a faculty member and department chair of the Business Technology department at Madison College in Madison, Wisconsin, for over 14 years. She also serves
as the curriculum coordinator for Microsoft Excel beginning, intermediate, and
advanced level courses for the college. As well as teaching, Kristyn provides training to businesses on the Microsoft Office Suite including MS Project, project management, customer service, personal productivity, and time management. Prior to
teaching at Madison College, she taught at a business college in Des Moines, Iowa,
where she helped implement their online learning program while also teaching traditional business courses.

Dedications

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Contents
Chapter 1: Plan a Project

Chapter 2: Creating a Detailed Project Plan

1

Preparing a Project Plan 2
Understand Project Management and Microsoft
Project Terminology 2
Starting a Project

4

Explore the Project 2016 Window

5

Modifying the Quick Access Toolbar and Collapsing the
Ribbon 6

Prepare a Project Schedule

9

Modify a Project Calendar

Entering Project Tasks

19

20

21

Modify Project Tasks in Project 2016

23

Adding and Modifying Project Tasks in the
Entry Table 23
Deleting Project Tasks in the Entry Table 26
Moving, Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Project Tasks in
the Entry Table 27
Modifying Project Tasks in Calendar View 29
Modifying Project Tasks in Network Diagram View 32

Create Task Dependencies
Adding Task Dependencies

34

Modify Task Dependencies and Task
Constraints 41
Modifying Dependencies and Constraints
Adding Tasks to the Timeline 43
Deleting Task Dependencies 44

70

Preparing to Print in Gantt Chart View 45
Preparing to Print in Calendar View 48
Preparing to Print in Network Diagram View

76

Setting Your Project to Effort Driven 77
Changing Task Durations with Resource
Assignments 78
Using the Work Task Form in Split View 81

View Resource Assignments in the Team Planner
View 83
Viewing Resource Assignments in Team Planner
View 83
Enhance a Project Schedule with Elapsed Duration
and Recurring Tasks 84
Adding Elapsed Durations 84
Adding a Recurring Task 87

Share Project Information
Creating Project Reports

88
89

Copy and Paste Project Information to Other
Applications 91

Share Project Information with Microsoft Excel

41

Prepare Project for Printing Project Views

iv

62

Creating a Work Breakdown Structure 64
Filtering a WBS in Gantt Chart and Network Diagram
Views 66
Displaying WBS Code in the Entry Table 68

Copying and Pasting Project Information to Excel
and Word 91
Copying Project Information as a Picture 93

36

Concept Check 51
Key Terms 51
Visual Summary 52
Practice 53
Problem Solve 55
Perform 1: Perform in Your Life 56

60

Change Task Durations by Adding Resources
15

Understand Manually Scheduled Versus Auto
Scheduled Projects 18
Creating a Project Plan 19
Identify and Enter Project Tasks

Identifying the Critical Path

Create a Work Breakdown Structure

Creating Project Resources 71
Assigning Project Resources 73

12

Modifying a Project Calendar 12
Adding Exceptions to the Project Calendar

Auto Scheduling a Project

Detailing a Project Plan 60
Identify the Critical Path 60

Create and Assign Project Resources

Preparing a Project Schedule Using the Project
Information Dialog Box 11

59

45

49

96

Exporting Project Information to Excel 96
Importing Project Information from Excel 98
Adjusting Imported Project Tasks 103
Adding a Project Summary Task 106
Linking Excel Data to Project 107

Use and Create Project Templates

108

Creating a Project Plan from an Existing Project
Template 108
Creating a Custom Project Template 110
Using a Custom Project Template 112

Concept Check 114
Key Terms 114
Visual Summary 114

Contents

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Practice 115
Problem Solve 1 117
Perform 1: Perform in Your Career 119
Microsoft Project 2016 Business Unit 1 121
Business Unit Capstone
More Practice 1 121

121

Bathroom Remodel Project 121

Problem Solve 1 123
Landscaping Project 123

Problem Solve 2 124
Manufacturing Project

124

Perform 1: Perform in Your Life 125
Basement Construction Project

125

Perform 2: Perform in Your
Career 127
Convention Planning Project 127

Glossary
Index 131

129

Contents

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Acknowledgments
The Your Office team would like to thank the following reviewers who have invested time and energy to help shape
this series from the very beginning, providing us with invaluable feedback through their comments, suggestions, and
constructive criticism.
We’d like to thank all of our conscientious reviewers, including those who contributed to our previous editions:
Sven Aelterman
Troy University

Margo Chaney
Carroll Community College

Joseph F. Domagala
Duquesne University

Nitin Aggarwal
San Jose State University

Shanan Chappell
College of the Albemarle, North Carolina

Bambi Edwards
Craven Community College

Heather Albinger
Waukesha County Technical College

Kuan-Chou Chen
Purdue University, Calumet

Elaine Emanuel
Mt. San Antonio College

Angel Alexander
Piedmont Technical College

David Childress
Ashland Community and Technical
College

Diane Endres
Ancilla College

Melody Alexander
Ball State University
Karen Allen
Community College of Rhode Island
Maureen Allen
Elon University
Wilma Andrews
Virginia Commonwealth University
Mazhar Anik
Owens Community College
David Antol
Harford Community College
Kirk Atkinson
Western Kentucky University
Barbara Baker
Indiana Wesleyan University
Kristi Berg
Minot State University
Kavuri Bharath
Old Dominion University
Ann Blackman
Parkland College
Jeanann Boyce
Montgomery College
Lynn Brooks
Tyler Junior College
Cheryl Brown
Delgado Community
College West
Bank Campus

Keh-Wen Chuang
Purdue University North Central

Nancy Evans
Indiana University, Purdue University,
Indianapolis

Suzanne Clayton
Drake University

Christa Fairman
Arizona Western College

Amy Clubb
Portland Community College

Marni Ferner
University of North Carolina,
Wilmington

Bruce Collins
Davenport University
Linda Collins
Mesa Community College
Margaret Cooksey
Tallahassee Community College
Charmayne Cullom
University of Northern Colorado
Christy Culver
Marion Technical College
Juliana Cypert
Tarrant County College
Harold Davis
Southeastern Louisiana University
Jeff Davis
Jamestown Community College
Jennifer Day
Sinclair Community College
Anna Degtyareva
Mt. San Antonio College
Beth Deinert
Southeast Community
College

Paula Fisher
Central New Mexico Community College
Linda Fried
University of Colorado, Denver
Diana Friedman
Riverside Community College
Susan Fry
Boise State University
Virginia Fullwood
Texas A&M University, Commerce
Janos Fustos
Metropolitan State College of Denver
John Fyfe
University of Illinois at Chicago
Saiid Ganjalizadeh
The Catholic University of America
Randolph Garvin
Tyler Junior College
Diane Glowacki
Tarrant County College
Jerome Gonnella
Northern Kentucky University

Bonnie Buchanan
Central Ohio Technical College

Kathleen DeNisco
Erie Community College

Lorie Goodgine
Tennessee Technology Center in Paris

Peggy Burrus
Red Rocks Community College

Donald Dershem
Mountain View College

Connie Grimes
Morehead State University

Richard Cacace
Pensacola State College

Sallie Dodson
Radford University

Debbie Gross
Ohio State University

vi

Acknowledgments

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Babita Gupta
California State University,
Monterey Bay
Lewis Hall
Riverside City College
Jane Hammer
Valley City State University
Marie Hartlein
Montgomery County Community
College
Darren Hayes
Pace University
Paul Hayes
Eastern New Mexico University
Mary Hedberg
Johnson County Community College
Lynda Henrie
LDS Business College
Deedee Herrera
Dodge City Community College
Marilyn Hibbert
Salt Lake Community College
Jan Hime
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Cheryl Hinds
Norfolk State University
Mary Kay Hinkson
Fox Valley Technical College
Margaret Hohly
Cerritos College
Brian Holbert
Spring Hill College
Susan Holland
Southeast Community College
Anita Hollander
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Emily Holliday
Campbell University
Stacy Hollins
St. Louis Community College Florissant
Valley
Mike Horn
State University of New York, Geneseo
Christie Hovey
Lincoln Land Community College
Margaret Hvatum
St. Louis Community College Meramec
Jean Insinga
Middlesex Community College
Kristyn Jacobson
Madison College
Jon (Sean) Jasperson
Texas A&M University
Glen Jenewein
Kaplan University
Gina Jerry
Santa Monica College

Dana Johnson
North Dakota State University

Lynne Lyon
Durham College

Mary Johnson
Mt. San Antonio College

Nicole Lytle
California State University, San
Bernardino

Linda Johnsonius
Murray State University
Carla Jones
Middle Tennessee State University
Susan Jones
Utah State University
Nenad Jukic
Loyola University, Chicago
Sali Kaceli
Philadelphia Biblical University
Sue Kanda
Baker College of Auburn Hills
Robert Kansa
Macomb Community College
Susumu Kasai
Salt Lake Community College
Linda Kavanaugh
Robert Morris University
Debby Keen
University of Kentucky
Mike Kelly
Community College of Rhode Island
Melody Kiang
California State University, Long Beach
Lori Kielty
College of Central Florida
Richard Kirk
Pensacola State College
Dawn Konicek
Blackhawk Tech
John Kucharczuk
Centennial College
David Largent
Ball State University
Frank Lee
Fairmont State University
Luis Leon
The University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga
Freda Leonard
Delgado Community College
Julie Lewis
Baker College, Allen Park
Suhong Li
Bryant Unversity
Renee Lightner
Florida State College
John Lombardi
South University
Rhonda Lucas
Spring Hill College
Adriana Lumpkin
Midland College

Donna Madsen
Kirkwood Community College
Susan Maggio
Community College of
Baltimore County
Michelle Mallon
Ohio State University
Kim Manning
Tallahassee Community College
Paul Martin
Harrisburg Area Community College
Cheryl Martucci
Diablo Valley College
Sebena Masline
Florida State College of Jacksonville
Sherry Massoni
Harford Community College
Lee McClain
Western Washington University
Sandra McCormack
Monroe Community College
Sue McCrory
Missouri State University
Barbara Miller
University of Notre Dame
Johnette Moody
Arkansas Tech University
Michael O. Moorman
Saint Leo University
Kathleen Morris
University of Alabama
Alysse Morton
Westminster College
Elobaid Muna
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Jackie Myers
Sinclair Community College
Russell Myers
El Paso Community College
Bernie Negrete
Cerritos College
Melissa Nemeth
Indiana University, Purdue University,
Indianapolis
Jennifer Nightingale
Duquesne University
Kathie O’Brien
North Idaho College
Michael Ogawa
University of Hawaii
Janet Olfert
North Dakota State University

Acknowledgments

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Rene Pack
Arizona Western College

Amy Rutledge
Oakland University

Lucia Vanderpool
Baptist College of Health Sciences

Patsy Parker
Southwest Oklahoma State Unversity

Candace Ryder
Colorado State University

Michelle Vlaich-Lee
Greenville Technical College

Laurie Patterson
University of North Carolina, Wilmington

Joann Segovia
Winona State University

Barry Walker
Monroe Community College

Alicia Pearlman
Baker College

Eileen Shifflett
James Madison University

Rosalyn Warren
Enterprise State Community College

Diane Perreault
Sierra College and California State
University, Sacramento

Sandeep Shiva
Old Dominion University

Sonia Washington
Prince George’s Community College

Robert Sindt
Johnson County Community College

Eric Weinstein
Suffolk County Community College

Cindi Smatt
Texas A&M University

Jill Weiss
Florida International University

Edward Souza
Hawaii Pacific University

Lorna Wells
Salt Lake Community College

Nora Spencer
Fullerton College

Rosalie Westerberg
Clover Park Technical College

Alicia Stonesifer
La Salle University

Clemetee Whaley
Southwest Tennessee Community
College

Theresa Phinney
Texas A&M University
Vickie Pickett
Midland College
Marcia Polanis
Forsyth Technical Community College
Rose Pollard
Southeast Community College
Stephen Pomeroy
Norwich University
Leonard Presby
William Paterson University
Donna Reavis
Delta Career Education
Eris Reddoch
Pensacola State College
James Reddoch
Pensacola State College
Michael Redmond
La Salle University
Terri Rentfro
John A. Logan College
Vicki Robertson
Southwest Tennessee Community
College
Jennifer Robinson
Trident Technical College
Dianne Ross
University of Louisiana at
Lafayette
Ann Rowlette
Liberty University

Jenny Lee Svelund
University of Utah
Cheryl Sypniewski
Macomb Community College
Arta Szathmary
Bucks County Community College
Nasser Tadayon
Southern Utah University
Asela Thomason
California State University Long Beach
Nicole Thompson
Carteret Community College
Terri Tiedeman
Southeast Community College,
Nebraska
Lewis Todd
Belhaven University
Barb Tollinger
Sinclair Community College
Allen Truell
Ball State University
Erhan Uskup
Houston Community College

Kenneth Whitten
Florida State College of Jacksonville
MaryLou Wilson
Piedmont Technical College
John Windsor
University of North Texas
Kathy Winters
University of Tennessee,
Chattanooga
Nancy Woolridge
Fullerton College
Jensen Zhao
Ball State University
Martha Zimmer
University of Evansville
Molly Zimmer
University of Evansville
Mary Anne Zlotow
College of DuPage
Matthew Zullo
Wake Technical Community
College

Additionally, we’d like to thank our MyITLab team for their review and collaboration with our text authors:
LeeAnn Bates
MyITLab content author

Becca Lowe
Media Producer

Jennifer Hurley
MyITLab content author

Ralph Moore
MyITLab content author

viii

Jerri Williams
MyITLab content author

Acknowledgments

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Preface
Real World Problem Solving for Business and
Beyond
The Your Office series provides the foundation for students to learn real world problem
solving for use in business and beyond. Students are exposed to hands-on technical content that is woven into realistic business scenarios and focuses on using Microsoft Office
as a decision-making tool.
Real world business exposure is a competitive advantage.
The series features a unique running business scenario—the Painted Paradise Resort &
Spa—that connects all of the cases together and exposes students to using Microsoft
Office to solve problems relating to business areas such as finance and accounting, production and operations, sales and marketing, and more. Look for the icons identifying the
business application of each case.
Active learning occurs in context.
Each chapter introduces a realistic business case for students to complete via hands-on
steps that are easily identified in blue-shaded boxes. Each blue box teaches a skill and
comes complete with video, interactive, and live auto-graded support with automatic
feedback.
Coursework that is relevant to students and their future
careers.
Real World Advice, Real World Interview Videos, and Real World Success Stories are
woven throughout the text and in the student resources. These share how former students
use the Microsoft Office concepts they learned in this class and had success in a variety
of careers.
Outcomes matter.
Whether it’s getting a good grade in this course, learning how to use Excel to be successful in other courses, or learning business skills that will support success in a future job,
every student has an outcome in mind. And outcomes matter. That is why we added a
Business Unit opener to focus on the outcomes students will achieve by working through
the cases and content of each chapter as well as the Capstone at the end of each unit.
No matter what career students may choose to pursue in life, this series will give
them the foundation to succeed. And as they learn these valuable problem-solving and
decision-making skills while becoming proficient in using Microsoft Office as a tool, they
will achieve their intended outcomes, making a positive impact on their lives.

Preface

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Key Features
Business Application Icons

Customer
Service

Finance &
Accounting

General
Business

Human
Resources

Information
Technology

Production &
Operations

Sales &
Marketing

Research &
Development

Soft Skills

The Outcomes focus allows students and instructors to focus on higher-level learning
goals and how those can be achieved through particular objectives and skills.
• Outcomes are written at the course level and the business unit level.
• Chapter Objectives list identifies the learning objectives to be achieved as students
work through the chapter. Page numbers are included for easy reference. These are
revisited in the Concepts Check at the end of the chapter.
• MOS Certification Guide for instructors and students directs anyone interested in
prepping for the MOS exam to the specific series resources to find all content required
for the test.
The real world focus reminds students that what they are learning is practical and
useful the minute they leave the classroom.
• Real World Success features in the chapter opener share anecdotes from real former
students, describing how knowledge of Office has helped them be successful in their
lives.
• Real World Advice boxes offer notes on best practices for general use of important
Office skills. The goal is to advise students as a manager might in a future job.
• Business Application icons appear with every case in the text and clearly identify which business application students are being exposed to (finance, marketing,
­operations, etc.).
Features for active learning help students learn by doing and immerse them in the
business world using Microsoft Office.
• Blue boxes represent the hands-on portion of the chapter and help students quickly
identify what steps they need to take to complete the chapter Prepare Case. This
material is easily distinguishable from explanatory text by the blue-shaded background.
• Starting and ending files appear before every case in the text. Starting files identify
exactly which student data files are needed to complete each case. Ending files are
provided to show students the naming conventions they should use when saving their
files. Each file icon is color coded by application.
• Side Note conveys a brief tip or piece of information aligned visually with a step in
the chapter, quickly providing key information to students completing that particular step.
• Consider This offers critical thinking questions and topics for discussion, set apart
as a boxed feature, allowing students to step back from the project and think about
the application of what they are learning and how these concepts might be used in
the future.
• Soft Skills icons appear with other boxed features and identify specific places where
students are being exposed to lessons on soft skills.
Study aids help students review and retain the material so they can recall it at a moment’s
notice.
• Quick Reference boxes summarize generic or alternative instructions on how to
accomplish a task. This feature enables students to quickly find important skills.
• Concept Check review questions, which appear at the end of the chapter, require
students to demonstrate their understanding of the objectives.

x

Key Features

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• Visual Summary offers a review of the objectives learned in the chapter using images
from the completed solution file, mapped to the chapter objectives with callouts and
page references, so students can easily find the section of text to refer to for a refresher.
Extensive cases allow students to progress from a basic understanding of Office through
to proficiency.
• Chapters all conclude with Practice, Problem Solve, and Perform Cases to
allow full mastery at the chapter level. Alternative versions of these cases are available
in Instructor Resources.
• Business Unit Capstones all include More Practice, Problem Solve, and
Perform Cases that require students to synthesize objectives from the two previous
chapters to extend their mastery of the content. Alternative versions of these cases are
available in Instructor Resources.
• More Grader Projects are offered with this edition, including Prepare cases as well
as Problem Solve cases at both the chapter and business unit capstone levels.

Key Features

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Resources
Instructor Resources
The Instructor’s Resource Center, available at www.pearsonhighered.com/irc includes the
following:
• Annotated Solution Files with Scorecards, which assist with grading the Prepare,
Practice, Problem Solve, and Perform cases
• Data and solution files
• Rubrics for Perform cases in Microsoft Word format, which enable instructors to
easily grade open-ended assignments with no definite solution
• PowerPoint presentations with notes for each chapter
• Lesson plans that provide a detailed blueprint to achieve chapter learning objectives
and outcomes and best use the unique structure of the business units
• Complete test bank, also available in TestGen format
• Additional Practice, Problem Solve, and Perform cases to provide variety and choice
in exercises at both the chapter and business unit levels
• Scripted Lectures, which provide instructors with a lecture outline that mirrors the
chapter Prepare case

Student Resources
Student Data Files
Access the student data files needed to complete the cases in this textbook at
www.pearsonhighered.com/youroffice.
Available in MyITLab
• Audio PowerPoints provide a lecture review of the chapter content and include
narration.
• eText is available in some MyITLab courses.
MyITLab for Office 2016 is a solution designed by professors for professors that allows
easy delivery of Office courses with defensible assessment and outcomes-based training.
The new Your Office 2016 system will seamlessly integrate online assessment, training,
and projects with MyITLab for Microsoft Office 2016!

xii

Resources

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v i s i o n s tat e m e n t

Dear Students,

If you want an edge over the competition, make it personal. Whether you love sports, travel,
the stock market, or ballet, your passion is personal to you. Capitalizing on your passion leads to
success. You live in a global marketplace, and your competition is global. The honors students in
China exceed the total number of students in North America. Skills can help set you apart, but
passion will make you stand above. Your Office is the tool to harness your passion’s true potential.
In prior generations, personalization in a professional setting was discouraged. You had
a “work” life and a “home” life. As the Series Editor, I write to you about the vision for Your
Office from my laptop, on my couch, in the middle of the night when inspiration struck me.
My classroom and living room are my office. Life has changed from generations before us.
So, let’s get personal. My degrees are not in technology, but chemistry and law. I helped put
myself through school by working full time in various jobs, including a successful technology
consulting business that continues today. My generation did not grow up with computers, but
I did. My father was a network administrator for the military. So, I was learning to program in
Basic before anyone had played Nintendo’s Duck Hunt or Tetris. Technology has always been
one of my passions from a young age. In fact, I now tell my husband: don’t buy me jewelry for
my birthday, buy me the latest gadget on the market!
In my first law position, I was known as the Office guru to the extent that no one gave me
a law assignment for the first two months. Once I submitted the assignment, my supervisor
remarked, “Wow, you don’t just know how to leverage technology, but you really know the law
too.” I can tell you novel-sized stories from countless prior students in countless industries who
gained an edge from using Office as a tool. Bringing technology to your passion makes you well
rounded and a cut above the rest, no matter the industry or position.
I am most passionate about teaching, in particular teaching technology. I come from many
generations of teachers, including my mother who is a kindergarten teacher. For over 12 years,
I have found my dream job passing on my passion for teaching, technology, law, science, music,
and life in general at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. I have tried to pass on
the key to engaging passion to my students. I have helped them see what differentiates them
from all the other bright students vying for the same jobs.
Microsoft Office is a tool. All of your competition will have learned Microsoft Office to some
degree or another. Some will have learned it to an advanced level. Knowing Microsoft Office is
important, but it is also fundamental. Without it, you will not be considered for a position.
Today, you step into your first of many future roles bringing Microsoft Office to your dream
job working for Painted Paradise Resort & Spa. You will delve into the business side of the
resort and learn how to use Your Office to maximum benefit.
Don’t let the context of a business fool you. If you don’t think of yourself as a business
person, you have no need to worry. Whether you realize it or not, everything is business. If you
want to be a nurse, you are entering the health care industry. If you want to be a football player
in the NFL, you are entering the business of sports as entertainment. In fact, if you want to be a
stay-at-home parent, you are entering the business of a family household where Your Office still
gives you an advantage. For example, you will be able to prepare a budget in Excel and analyze
what you need to do to afford a trip to Disney World!
At Painted Paradise Resort & Spa, you will learn how to make Office yours through four
learning levels designed to maximize your understanding. You will Prepare, Practice, and
Problem Solve your tasks. Then, you will astound when you Perform your new talents. You will
be challenged through Consider This questions and gain insight through Real World Advice.
There is something more. You want success in what you are passionate about in your life. It
is personal for you. In this position at Painted Paradise Resort & Spa, you will gain your ­personal
­competitive advantage that will stay with you for the rest of your life—Your Office.
Sincerely,
Amy Kinser

Series Editor
Vision Statement

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This page intentionally left blank

Welcome

to the

Team!

W

elcome to your new office at Painted Paradise Resort & Spa, where we
specialize in painting perfect getaways. As the Chief Technology Officer, I am
excited to have staff dedicated to the Microsoft Office integration between all the areas
of the resort. Our team is passionate about our paradise, and I hope you find this to be
your dream position here!
Painted Paradise is a resort and spa in New Mexico catering to business people,
romantics, families, and anyone who just needs to get away. Inside our resort are
many distinct areas. Many of these areas operate as businesses in their own right but
must integrate with the other areas of the resort. The main areas of the resort are as
follows.
• The Hotel is overseen by our Chief Executive Officer, William Mattingly, and is at the
core of our business. The hotel offers a variety of accommodations, ranging from
individual rooms to a grand villa suite. Further, the hotel offers packages including
spa, golf, and special events.
Room rates vary according to size, season, demand, and discount. The hotel
Terra Cotta Brew Coffee		
Shop
has discounts for typical groups, such as AARP. The hotel also has a loyalty program
where guests can earn free nights based on frequency of visits. Guests may charge
anything from the resort to the room.
Terra Cotta Brew Coffee Shop
• Red Bluff Golf Course is a private world-class golf course and pro shop. The golf
course has services such as golf lessons from the famous golf pro John Schilling
Terra Cotta Brew Coffee Shop
and playing packages. Also, the golf course attracts local residents. This requires
variety in pricing schemes to accommodate both local and hotel guests. The pro
shop sells many retail items online.
		
The golf course can also be reserved for special events and tournaments.
These special events can be in conjunction with a wedding, conference, meetings,
or other events covered by the event planning and catering area of the resort.
Terra Cotta Brew Coffee Shop

• Turquoise Oasis Spa is a full-service spa. Spa services include haircuts, pedicures, massages, facials, body wraps, waxing, and various other spa services—
typical to exotic. Further, the spa offers private consultation, weight training (in the
fitness center), a water bar, meditation areas, and steam rooms. Spa services are
offered both in the spa and in the resort guest's room.
		
Turquoise Oasis Spa uses top-of-the-line products and some house-brand
products. The retail side offers products ranging from candles to age-defying home
treatments. These products can also be purchased online. Many of the hotel guests
who fall in Terra
love with
the house-brand
soaps,
lotions, candles, and other items appreCotta
Brew Coffee
Shop
ciate being able to buy more at any time.
		
The spa offers a multitude of packages including special hotel room packages
that include spa treatments. Local residents also use the spa. So, the spa guests
3355 Hemmingway Circle • Santa Fe, New Mexico 89566

Terra Cotta Brew Coffee Shop

Terra Cotta Brew Coffee Shop
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are not limited to hotel guests. Thus, the packages also include pricing attractive to
the local community.
• Painted Treasures Gift Shop has an array of items available for purchase, from
toiletries to clothes to presents for loved ones back home including a healthy section
of kids’ toys for traveling business people. The gift shop sells a small sampling from
the spa, golf course pro shop, and local New Mexico culture. The gift shop also has a
small section of snacks and drinks. The gift shop has numerous part-time employees
including students from the local college.
• The Event Planning & Catering area is central to attracting customers to the resort.
From weddings to conferences, the resort is a popular destination. The resort has
a substantial number of staff dedicated to planning, coordinating, setting up, catering, and maintaining these events. The resort has several facilities that can accommodate large groups. Packages and prices vary by size, room, and other services
such as catering. Further, the Event Planning & Catering team works closely with
local vendors for floral decorations, photography, and other event or wedding typical
needs. However, all catering must go through the resort (no outside catering permitted). Lastly, the resort stocks several choices of decorations, table arrangements,
and centerpieces. These range from professional, simple, themed, and luxurious.
• Indigo5 and the Silver Moon Lounge, a world-class restaurant and lounge that
is overseen by the well-known Chef Robin Sanchez. The cuisine is balanced and
modern. From steaks to pasta to local southwestern meals, Indigo5 attracts local
patrons in addition to resort guests. While the catering function is separate from the
restaurant—though menu items may be shared—the restaurant does support all
room service for the resort. The resort also has smaller food venues onsite such as
the Terra Cotta Brew coffee shop in the lobby.
Currently, these areas are using Office to various degrees. In some areas, paper and
pencil are still used for most business functions. Others have been lucky enough to have
some technology savvy team members start Microsoft Office Solutions.
Using your skills, I am confident that you can help us integrate and use Microsoft
Office on a whole new level! I hope you are excited to call Painted Paradise Resort &
Spa Your Office.
Looking forward to working with you more closely!

Aidan Matthews
Aidan Matthews
Chief Technology Officer

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Microsoft Project 2016
Chapter 1

OBJECTIVES

PLAN A PROJECT

Prepare Case

Information
Technology

1. Understand project
management and
Microsoft Project
terminology p. 2

Painted Paradise Golf Resort—
Annual Charity Golf Tournament

2. Explore the Project
2016 window p. 5

ment to raise money for the purchase of textbooks to be donated to selected

3. Prepare a Project
schedule p. 9

projects, Julie Rholfing, has assigned Patti Rochelle, the tournament planning

4. Modify a Project
calendar p. 12

Microsoft Project 2016 to begin planning this year’s tournament. Before Patti

5. Understand manually
scheduled versus auto
scheduled projects p. 18
6. Identify and enter
project tasks p. 20

The Painted Paradise Golf Resort will be holding its annual charity golf tournaelementary schools in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The vice president (VP) of special
manager, to be the project manager of this event. Julie has asked Patti to use
can begin entering in the tasks that need to be completed for the tournament,
she must first understand the Project 2016 window, Project 2016 views, and
the Project 2016 calendar. You will help Patti get
started with the setup of this project.

7. Modify project tasks in
Project 2016 p. 23
8. Create task
dependencies p. 34
9. Modify task
dependencies and task
constraints p. 41
10. Prepare Project for
printing project
views p. 45
Nmedia/fotolia

Student data files needed for this workshop:
No data file needed

You will save your file as:
pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_LastFirst.mpp

1

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Preparing a Project Plan
It is common today to work with teams or with groups of people to reach a desired outcome. Outcomes can be reached by brainstorming, communicating, planning, and then
completing the plan as defined. Whether you work on a team or work alone, taking the
time to plan before acting may help improve your chances of success. The process of planning and following through with a plan is project management.
In this chapter, you will be introduced to project management terminology and processes. Then you will learn how to get started using Project 2016, a project planning
application often used to help create detailed project plans.
Understand Project Management and
Microsoft Project Terminology
Project management is a process of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and
closing a project’s tasks and resources in order to accomplish a project’s goal. A project
goal is the desired result of a project upon completion. A project’s goal is met when project tasks are completed on time, on budget, and within the scope of a given project. All
projects, large or small, should follow the project management process groups, as shown
in Table 1, to reach project success.

Process Group Responsibility
Initiating

Set a project goal; identify a project schedule; define a project budget

Planning

Enter project tasks; determine task relationships; assign project
resources

Executing

Produce results; report results

Monitoring and
Control

Update tasks as in progress or completed; manage resources

Closing

Analyze performance; prepare final reports

Table 1

Project management process groups

REAL WORLD ADVICE

Resources for Project Managers

If you are new to project management, you are not alone! There are many resources available for
project managers who seek assistance with project management information and practices. One
resource is A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). This guide
defines project management terminology and presents industry standard guidelines for managing
projects.
Another resource is the Project Management Institute (PMI). By joining PMI, project managers
can get access to PMI publications, stay updated on global standards, have networking opportunities
with other project managers, and have access to project management tools and templates to help
manage projects. PMI also provides training and access to the Project Management Professional
(PMP) certification.
Office.microsoft.com offers videos on Project 2016. This is a helpful resource for project
managers who may be new to using the software.

A project manager is the person responsible for overseeing all the details of the
project plan. The project manager works to create a plan that will lead to project success.
A project manager also motivates project team members to achieve the project goals.
Project managers may choose to use project planning software such as Project 2016 to
help them plan and achieve project success. Project planning software keeps track of
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CHAPTER 1

tasks, the duration to complete tasks, scheduled dates, project resources, and project costs
organized in one location for a more efficient way of managing a project. It is a tool that
allows project managers to track, analyze, and summarize project information.
In order to use project planning software, it is important to understand terminology
associated with the software. A task is an activity that is completed to reach a project
goal. For example, when planning for a charity golf tournament, a task could be “set
tournament date and time” or “prepare preliminary budget.”
Task duration is the prediction of time it will take to complete a task. Task durations in Project can be entered in minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, and years. For
example, it may be determined it takes two days to “set tournament date and time” but
two weeks to “prepare preliminary budget.”
A predecessor task is a task that must be completed before the next task can start.
A task that has a predecessor is called a successor task. Project managers often use
the term task dependency when referring to how the predecessor or successor tasks are
connected. A task dependency is a relationship between two tasks that defines which task(s)
have to finish before the next task(s) can start. A task dependency is often called a task link.
Since not all tasks are the same in a project, scheduling them the same way may not
be an option. Therefore, some tasks may have constraints applied. A constraint is a limitation set on a task. For example, a task of “create tournament website” may have a constraint of “finish no later than” a certain date to ensure the website is up and running in
time to gather enough registrations for the event. Constraints on tasks affect how the task
is scheduled. Setting constraints on tasks will determine how Project 2016 will schedule
a task. Besides setting specific date constraints on a task, the following task constraints
can be set on an individual task:
• As late as possible
• As soon as possible
• Finish no earlier than
• Finish no later than
• Must finish on
• Must start on
• Start no earlier than
• Start no later than
A resource is work, a material, or a cost associated with a project task. Work
resources are people and equipment. Material resources are resources consumed during
the project. Cost resources are independent costs associated with a task. For example, a
task of “provide transportation from the airport” may have a cost of “$2,000 limousine
service.” Project managers assign resources to project tasks to help determine a project’s
schedule and a project’s cost.
The scope of a project is what must be completed to deliver a specific product or
service. The project scope includes the meeting of project goals, tasks, and deadlines set.
Project managers use planning software such as Project 2016 to prevent deviating from
the scope of a project.
A milestone is a task that is used to communicate project progress or mark a significant
point in a project such as the end of a project phase. Milestones are entered into the Project
2016 software as a task with zero duration. For example, a milestone for the charity golf
tournament could be “tournament website goes live.” By default, Project 2016 displays a
milestone as a diamond in the Gantt chart. A Gantt chart is a graphical representation of
tasks where tasks are shown against a timeline displayed as horizontal bars in which the
length of the bar is determined by the activities durations and start/finish dates.
Preparing a Project Plan

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Starting a Project

You have been asked to work on the planning team for the Painted Paradise Golf Resort
Charity Golf Tournament. Your role on the team will be to set up a project plan in Project
2016. To get started, you will open and save a project.
In this exercise, you will start, save, close, and open a project.

To Begin, Save, Close, and Open a Project

PM01.00

a. On the taskbar, click Ask me anything or Search the web and Windows.
Type proj.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

b. Click Project 2016 in the search results. The Project Start screen is displayed.

Figure 1

Creating a new project

c. Click Blank Project to open a new blank project.
d. Click the File tab, and then click Save As.
e. Click Browse, and then navigate to the location where you are saving your files.
f.

Click in the File name box, and then type pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_
LastFirst, using your last name and first name. Click Save.

g. Click the File tab, and then click Close. The project file will close, but the Project
application will remain open.

Troubleshooting
If Project 2016 closed completely, perform steps a–b again. Click the File tab, and then click
Open. Browse to where you store your files, and then click pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_
LastFirst.mpp. Click Open. You could also perform step a–b again, and then click the file
name in the left pane to reopen the file.

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i.

CHAPTER 1

h. In the Navigation Pane, click Open, and then browse, if necessary, to locate
pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_LastFirst.mpp.
Click pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_LastFirst.mpp, and then click Open to
reopen your project file.

Explore the Project 2016 Window
When opening a new Project 2016 file, the default view is the Gantt Chart view, as
shown in Figure 2. There may be slight differences with the view of your Project 2016
window. You will learn how to adjust the Project 2016 window in this chapter.

Ribbon

Select All
Indicators column
Timeline

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Timescale

Task Name column
Task Mode column
Split bar

Nonworking days

Row selector
Gantt chart
View Bar

Entry table

Figure 2

View buttons

Project 2016 window

Gantt Chart view lists task details in the Entry table on the left side of the window
and displays each task graphically in the Gantt chart on the right side of the window. In
the Gantt chart, a project’s tasks are shown against a timeline. The activities are displayed
as horizontal bars in which the length of the bar is determined by the duration of the
activities and start/finish dates. The Entry table is used to enter task information and is
located to the left of the Gantt chart. The Entry table contains columns and rows similar
to Microsoft Excel 2016. The Entry table is used to record project tasks, durations, predecessors, and resources. Each task becomes a new row in the Entry table. A vertical split
bar separates the Entry table and the Gantt chart. If desired, the split bar can be dragged
to resize the panes.
A row selector is the box containing the row number of a task in the Entry table.
The Select All button is a button that selects all tasks and task information in the Entry
table.
The Timeline is a visual representation of the project from start to finish.
The Timeline is displayed above the Entry table and Gantt chart and below the ribbon.
You can choose what to display on the Timeline. If the Timeline is added, it will be
Preparing a Project Plan

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visible in the other Project 2016 views as well. The timescale is located above the Gantt
chart. The timescale displays the unit of measure that determines the length of the Gantt
bars in the Gantt chart.
The light gray vertical bars in the Gantt chart represent nonworking days. A
nonworking day is a day during which Project 2016 will not schedule work to occur.
Therefore, if a task starts at 8:00 AM on a Friday and has a three-day duration, Project
2016 would schedule the task for Friday 8:00 AM–5:00 PM, Monday 8:00 AM–5:00
PM, and Tuesday 8:00 AM–5:00 PM.
The Indicators column is a column in the Entry table that will display an icon that
provides further information about a task. For example, if the constraint of a specific date
is set to a task, a calendar icon would appear in the Indicators column.
The Task Mode column indicates the mode in which Project 2016 will schedule
tasks, either manually or automatically. A task’s mode can be adjusted by using the Task
Mode arrow within the Task Mode column.
The Task Name column is a location in the Entry table where the name of each
task is entered. One task is entered per row. Task names should be descriptive but not
too wordy.
The View Bar is a vertical bar on the left-hand side of the Project 2016 window that
contains buttons for quick access to different Project 2016 views. The View Bar can be
turned on and off based on a project planner’s preference. Use the View Bar’s navigation
buttons to easily navigate within the different Project 2016 views.
Project 2016 uses the Office 2016 design and layout of the ribbon as shown in
Figure 2. The ribbon is a row of tabs with buttons that appears at the top of the Project
2016 window. The ribbon may be open as shown in Figure 2 or may also be collapsed to
save screen space.
The Quick Access Toolbar appears in the top-left corner of the Project 2016 window
as shown in Figure 3. The Quick Access Toolbar is a series of small icons for commonly
used commands. The default icons on the Quick Access Toolbar are the Save, Undo,
and Redo buttons. If using a touch-enabled laptop, you may also see the Touch/Mouse
Mode button as a default button on the Quick Access Toolbar. However, you can modify
the Quick Access Toolbar to fit your project needs by adding or removing buttons. For
example, reports from Project 2016 often need to be printed, and time could be saved by
adding the Print Preview button to the Quick Access Toolbar.
Modifying the Quick Access Toolbar and Collapsing the Ribbon

Since you are sharing the project with other team members, you want to be sure you
always have proper spelling in your project plan. Project 2016 does not automatically
check for proper spelling; therefore, you decide to add the Spelling button to your project’s Quick Access Toolbar.
In this exercise, you will modify the Quick Access Toolbar and collapse the
ribbon.

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SIDE NOTE

To Modify the Quick Access Toolbar and Collapse the Ribbon
a. Click the Quick Access Toolbar arrow.

CHAPTER 1

PM01.01
View Bar
If the View Bar is not
visible on the left-hand
side of the Project 2016
window, right-click the
vertical text GANTT
CHART on the left-hand
side of the window and
click View Bar.

Quick Access Toolbar arrow

Figure 3

Quick Access Toolbar shortcut menu

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

b. Click More Commands.
c. Click the Choose commands from arrow.
Choose commands from arrow

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

All Commands option

Figure 4

Project Options dialog box to customize the Quick Access Toolbar
Preparing a Project Plan

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SIDE NOTE

Modifying the Quick
Access Toolbar

d. Click All Commands, and then scroll through the list of commands. Click
Spelling.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

You can also add buttons to the Quick Access
Toolbar by right-clicking
a button on the ribbon
and clicking Add to
Quick Access Toolbar.

Spelling button

Figure 5

Add button

Project Options dialog box

e. Click Add, and then click OK. The Spelling button
Access Toolbar.

will be added to the Quick

Modified Quick Access Toolbar

Figure 6

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Modified Quick Access Toolbar

f.

Double-click the Task tab. Notice the ribbon is now collapsed.

Ribbon collapsed

Figure 7
8

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Ribbon collapsed

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g. Double-click the Task tab again to show the ribbon.

CHAPTER 1

h. Right-click the Task tab.

Collapse the Ribbon selection

Figure 8

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Collapsing the ribbon

i.

Click Collapse the Ribbon. The ribbon is now collapsed.

j.

Right-click the Task tab again. Click Collapse the Ribbon to show the ribbon.

k. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save

.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Prepare a Project Schedule
Project 2016 has a complex scheduling engine, so to understand how it will calculate
a project’s schedule, it is important to review the Project Information dialog box.
The Project Information button is found in the Properties group on the Project tab. Click
the Project Information button to open the Project Information dialog box.
The Project Information dialog box is used to update various aspects of a project
such as the project’s start date or finish date, current date, status date, project base calendar, etc. Before entering specific task information for a project, the project’s information
should be identified. First, one must select whether the project will be scheduled from
Start date or from Finish date. Project Start date is the date Project 2016 uses to schedule
tasks that will calculate the project’s Finish date. Scheduling a project by Start date is the
most commonly used scheduling method. Project Finish date is the date Project 2016
uses to schedule tasks that will calculate the project’s Start date. Scheduling projects by
Finish date, while less common, helps determine the latest date a project can start and
still finish by that finish date. A project can only be scheduled by Start date or Finish
date, not by both. Start date is the default in the software.
If a project is set to calculate by Start date, as shown in Figure 9, all tasks will be
scheduled to begin as soon as possible. If you schedule by Start date, Project 2016 will

Figure 9

Project Information dialog box
Preparing a Project Plan

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Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

calculate when the project should finish. The Finish date would be determined by individual tasks, task durations, task predecessors, and resources assigned to tasks.
If a project is set to calculate by Finish date, all tasks will be scheduled to begin as late
as possible, as shown in Figure 10. If the project is scheduled by Finish date, Project 2016
will determine the date you must begin your project to be able to complete the project
by the set finish date. The Start date would be determined by individual tasks, task durations, task predecessors, and resources assigned to tasks.

Figure 10

Project Scheduled by Finish date

CONSIDER THIS

Scheduling by Finish Date

While most projects are scheduled by Start date, you may need to schedule your project by Finish date
to determine the latest date you can start the project. If you schedule a project by Finish date, it may be
wise to switch back to scheduling from the Start date when work on the project begins. Projects scheduled by Start date help to show the progress of your project and to keep track of factors and situations
that might cause the Finish date to change.

The Current date is today’s date as determined by your computer’s clock. The current date can be changed by entering a new date in the Current date section of the Project
Information dialog box or by clicking the arrow for Current date and selecting a new date.
The Status date is the date set to run reports on a project’s progress. For example, if
a weekly team meeting is on Monday morning to review the current status of the project
for the week ahead, the Status date may be set to the Friday before the Monday morning
meeting. To run status reports, a project baseline must be set. A baseline is a record of
each task at a point in time from which you will track project progress.
Project 2016 determines a project’s schedule off the base calendar. A base calendar is
the calendar applied to the project in the Project Information dialog box and provides a
template for how the software will schedule tasks and resources. The default base calendar is the Standard calendar. The Standard calendar specifies hours in which work can
occur. These hours are referred to as working time. If a project is set to schedule based
on the Standard calendar, all tasks and each resource are scheduled according to this calendar. The Standard calendar is based on a 40-hour work week with an 8-hour work day
(8:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM) Monday through Friday. Saturday and
Sunday are considered nonworking days. If you recall, nonworking days are days which
Project 2016 will not schedule any work to be completed.
Other available predetermined calendar choices are shown in Figure 11. The
24 Hours calendar assigns a schedule with continuous work. This type of calendar may
be assigned to a project that must work around the clock—for example, a mechanical
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Calendar selections

Figure 11

CHAPTER 1

process. The Night Shift calendar assigns a schedule that is sometimes referred to as
the “graveyard” shift schedule of Monday night through Saturday morning, 11:00 PM to
8:00 AM, with an hour off for break time.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Project calendar choices

Project managers can set the priority of a project in the Project Information dialog box.
The priority of a project is determined on a scale of 1 to 1,000 with 1 being the lowest priority and 1,000 being the highest priority. A project with a priority of 1,000 is considered
more important than a project with a priority of 100. Priorities are only used when project
managers are trying to balance resource assignments among tasks and projects.
Preparing a Project Schedule Using the
Project Information Dialog Box

Patti Rochelle has asked you to help determine the date for the charity golf tournament. Therefore, you will use Project 2016 to help calculate a possible tournament date.
You will begin planning the project at the end of April; therefore, Patti has asked you to
plan the project start date as of April 30, 2019.
In this exercise, you will change project information.

PM01.02

To Change the Project Information
a. Click the Project tab, and then click Project Information

SIDE NOTE

Selecting a Start Date

.

b. In the Start date field, type April 30, 2019. In the Current date field, type April 23, 2019.
Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

You can also select a
start date by using the
Start date arrow and
scrolling through the
calendar until you see
the desired date.

Figure 12

Project Information dialog box with modified start and current date

Preparing a Project Plan

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c. Verify the Standard Calendar is selected, and then click OK.
d. Save

the project.

Modify a Project Calendar
Once a base calendar has been assigned to a project, it is important the base calendar
accurately reflects the working time hours a project team is available to work on the
project. If not, Project 2016 will calculate an incorrect project schedule that may lead to
a project’s failure.
Take the charity golf tournament as an example. If the base calendar of the project is
the Standard calendar, Project 2016 will schedule all tasks on a 40-hour-per-week working time schedule. If the task of “prepare preliminary budget” is entered with a 1-week
duration, Project 2016 will schedule 40 hours of work to the task. Project 2016 will
assign this task a duration of 5 working days (8 hours per day for 5 days for a total of
40 hours).
Now imagine there are only 20 hours available each week to dedicate to this project
due to other commitments (not the 40 hours as set by the base Standard calendar). If this
is the case, the Standard calendar must be modified to reflect the actual working time
available. If modifications to the calendar are not made, Project 2016 will schedule the
work incorrectly. To review how Project 2016 schedules tasks based on a project’s calendar, refer to Table 2.

Calendar

Task Duration

Working Time

Standard calendar with a
40-hour work week

1 week duration = 40 hours
of work

5 days (40 hours/8 hours
per day = 5 days)

Modified Standard calendar
with a 20-hour work week

1 week duration = 40 hours
of work

10 days (40 hours/4 hours
per day = 10 days)

Table 2

Duration and start or finish dates

Modifying a Project Calendar

It is possible to adjust the Standard calendar to meet your project needs. Patti Rochelle,
the project manager for the charity golf tournament, and her project team are only available to work on this project Tuesday through Friday 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM (16 hours per
week). You will need to adjust the base Standard calendar to reflect the actual working
time available.

To Change the Project Calendar Working Time

PM01.03

a. Click the Project tab, if necessary.
b. In the Properties group, click Change Working Time
Working Time dialog box for the Standard calendar.

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to open the Change

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Figure 13

Details button

CHAPTER 1

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Work Weeks tab

Change Working Time dialog box

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

c. Click the Work Weeks tab in the bottom section of the dialog box, and then click
the Details button. The Details for dialog box opens.

Figure 14

Calendar Details dialog box

Preparing a Project Plan

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Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

d. In the Details for dialog box, click Monday, and then click Set days to nonworking
time.

Set days to nonworking time

Select day of week

Figure 15

Mondays set to nonworking days

e. Click Tuesday, press and hold S, and then click Friday.
f.

Click Set day(s) to these specific working times:.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

g. In the specified work times grid, point to row 2, and then click the 2 in row 2. Press
D to clear the 1:00 PM–5:00 PM work times.

Set day(s) to these
specific working times

Select day(s) of the week

Working time in
row 2 deleted

Figure 16

Specific working time for days of the week

h. Click OK. The base calendar has now been changed to reflect that Mondays are
nonworking days and Tuesday–Friday working hours are 8:00 AM–12:00 PM.
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CHAPTER 1

Troubleshooting
If necessary, scroll through the calendar in the Change Working Time dialog box
until you see April 2019.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Working times changed

Mondays set to nonworking days

Figure 17

Change Working Time dialog box

i.

Click OK to close the Change Working Time dialog box, and then Save
project.

REAL WORLD ADVICE

the

Working with Microsoft Project 2016
Around the Globe

In today’s global economy, it is likely you will work for a company that has locations in different
states or even countries. Therefore, when preparing your project calendar, consideration must be
given to where your project team members reside. Although many countries consider a typical
work week Monday through Friday with Saturday and Sunday as nonworking days, some countries
may work on a 6-day work week or even a 4-day work week. So that Project 2016 has accurate
information when creating a project’s schedule, it is important that the base calendar accurately
reflects the availability of all project team members.

Adding Exceptions to the Project Calendar

Since all organizations do not observe the same holidays, Project 2016 does not
include holidays in the Project calendars. If your organization and/or project team
observes holidays, you should account for them in the project’s calendar. If holidays
are not accounted for, Project 2016 cannot factor them into the project’s schedule and
therefore may miscalculate the project schedule by assigning work on a nonworking day.
Holidays can be added to a project calendar by creating exceptions to a project’s base
calendar.
Preparing a Project Plan

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Patti Rochelle, the project manager for the charity golf tournament, has clarified
that the following holidays will be observed by the project staff: July 4-5, 2019, and
September 3, 2019. Therefore, you will need to make these days nonworking days in the
project’s calendar by adding exceptions to the project’s calendar.
In this exercise, you will add exceptions to the project calendar.

To Add Exceptions to the Project Calendar

PM01.04

a. Click the Project tab, if necessary, and then in the Properties group, click
Change Working Time to open the Change Working Time dialog box once again.
b. On the calendar, click July 4, 2019, press and hold S, and then click
July 5, 2019.

Troubleshooting
If you do not see the correct dates in the Change Working Time calendar, you
may need to scroll through the calendar until July 2019 is visible.

c. In the bottom section of the Change Working Time dialog box, click the
Exceptions tab, and then click in the first empty cell in the Name column.
d. Type US Independence Day as the first exception, and then press T. Click in
the next blank row of the Exceptions table. Verify that the dates of July 4-5, 2019,
have been changed to nonworking days.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Exception displayed
on the calendar

Exception added

Figure 18

Calendar exception added

e. Click in the next empty cell in the Exceptions Name column, and then type
Company Picnic.
f.
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Press T, and then click in the Start column.

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CHAPTER 1

g. Click the Start column arrow to display the date picker, change the Start date to
September 3, 2019, and then press T. Click the Finish column to verify that
September 3, 2019, is a nonworking day.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Exception displayed
on the calendar

Exception added

Figure 19

Calendar exception added

Troubleshooting
If an exception is not appearing as a nonworking day in the calendar, click the
Exception row in the Exceptions Name box, and then click the Details button.
Set the selected Exception day to Nonworking, and then click OK.

h. Click OK to close the Change Working Time dialog box, and then Save

REAL WORLD ADVICE

the project.

Task Calendars

One size does not fit all when it comes to Project 2016 calendars! To make sure Project 2016 is
creating an accurate schedule, individual tasks may need to be completed outside of the base
calendar working time. For example, if the charity golf tournament’s base calendar is set to working
times of Tuesday–Friday, 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM, but training for event staff needs to occur from
1:00 PM to 5:00 PM, a task calendar can be created to reflect the training times of 1:00 PM to
5:00 PM. Once a task calendar is created, the calendar is applied to the appropriate task(s), and
Project 2016 is then able to schedule those particular tasks outside of the base calendar working
times. Task calendars can be created for any task that does not follow the working and nonworking
times set on the project’s base calendar.

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QUICK REFERENCE

Creating a Task Calendar

To create a task calendar, click the Project tab, and then:
1. Click Change Working Time in the Properties group.
2. Click the Create New Calendar button, and then enter a name for the task calendar. Click OK.
3. Click the Work Weeks tab.
4. Click the next empty cell in the Name column. Enter a descriptive name and press T, and
then click in the Start cell.
5. Click the Details button. In the Details dialog box, choose the appropriate option for your task
calendar. Edit the From and To times as necessary. Click OK in both dialog boxes.
Once the new task calendar is created, it would need to be assigned to specific tasks using the
Task Information dialog box.

Understand Manually Scheduled Versus
Auto Scheduled Projects
To understand how Project 2016 schedules tasks, it is important to identify if tasks are
being scheduled manually or automatically. The default in Project 2016 is for tasks to be
Manually Scheduled. In this mode, you enter a task duration and the task Start date for
a task, and then Project 2016 will calculate the Finish date. In other words, task dates are
not calculated or adjusted by Project’s 2016 scheduling engine, even if changes to related
tasks are made. Project managers who desire more control over the project schedule may
elect to use manual scheduling.
If a project manager wants to take advantage of Project’s 2016 scheduling engine,
however, the project would likely be set to Auto Scheduled. If a project is set to Auto
Scheduled, the project schedule is calculated based on the project’s calendar, project
tasks and task durations, task dependencies, resource assignments, and any constraint
dates assigned to tasks. Auto scheduled projects are more structured than manually
scheduled projects.
Figure 20 displays how Project 2016 is scheduling the two tasks differently. Because
Task 1 is being Manually Scheduled , it has no Start date or Finish date calculated
by Project 2016 even though a duration of two days has been assigned to the task.
, and therefore, the Start date and Finish date are
Task 2 is set to Auto Scheduled
calculated by Project 2016 based on the project’s calendar and the task duration. Also
note the differences in the Gantt bars in the Gantt chart from Manually Scheduled to
Auto Scheduled tasks.

Manually Scheduled task identifier

Auto Scheduled task identifier

Figure 20
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Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Manually Scheduled versus Auto Scheduled tasks

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CHAPTER 1

Table 3 explains additional differences between a manual scheduling and automatic
scheduling of project tasks.

Manual Scheduling

Automatic Scheduling

Duration

Can be number, date, or text
information, such as “4 days” or
"a few days”

Only numbers can be used that
represent length and units, such
as “4 days” or “2 weeks”

Project Calendar

Ignored by Project

Used by Project to determine a
project’s schedule

Constraints

Ignored by Project

Used by Project to determine task
Start or Finish date

Task Relationships Can be assigned but won’t
(links)
change the task schedule

Can be assigned and will change
the schedule of a task

Resources

Can be assigned to tasks. Used
by Project to help determine best
schedule

Table 3

Can be assigned to tasks but
won’t change the task schedule

Manual scheduling versus automatic scheduling

Auto Scheduling a Project

A project can be set to Auto Scheduled so that all tasks, unless otherwise specified, are
scheduled by Project’s scheduling engine. If a project is set to Auto Scheduled, individual
tasks can be changed to Manually Scheduled, if necessary. A project set to Manually
Scheduled will allow the project manager to determine the Start and Finish dates of
a project’s tasks. If a project is set to Manually Scheduled, individual tasks can be set
to Auto Scheduled. To change individual tasks, click the Task tab and then click Auto
Schedule in the Tasks group or click the arrow in the Task Mode column.
You are asked to set the project to Auto Scheduled so that Project 2016 can help you
determine when it is possible to hold the charity golf tournament. In this exercise, you
will change a project to Auto Scheduled.

PM01.05

To Change a Project to Auto Scheduled
a. Click New Tasks: Manually Scheduled on the status bar.

Status bar
Scheduling selections

Figure 21

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Project status bar

SIDE NOTE

Task Mode Column
The Task Mode column in
the Entry table will reflect
how a task is being scheduled once a task is entered.

b. Click Auto Scheduled – Task dates are calculated by Microsoft Project. All tasks
will now be calculated by Project 2016 unless set individually to Manually Scheduled.
c. Save
the project. If you need to take a break before finishing this chapter, now
is a good time.

Creating a Project Plan
Understanding project management terminology, exploring the Project 2016 window,
adjusting the Project 2016 calendar, and choosing a scheduling method are just the start
to creating a project plan. Time also needs to be spent on identifying project tasks, task
durations, task dependencies, and task constraints.
Creating a Project Plan

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Identify and Enter Project Tasks
Tasks are activities that must be completed to accomplish a project goal. Tasks are entered
into the Entry table in Gantt Chart view but can also be entered in the Network Diagram
view and the Calendar view. Task names should be concise, and each task should be
entered on a separate row in the Entry table. Tasks are assigned durations by the project’s
manager. In Project 2016, the default for a duration of one day is eight hours. Even if the
project schedule is set to a 20-hour work week versus a 40-hour work week, Project 2016
still calculates one day as eight hours by default.
Durations help Project 2016 to calculate a task’s Start (or Finish) date if a project is set to
Auto Scheduled. Durations can be entered into the software using the following abbreviations:
QUICK REFERENCE

Entering Task Durations

Duration Abbreviation

Result Duration

1 min

1 minute

1h

1 hour

1d

1 day (default) or 8 hours

1w

1 week

1 mon

1 month

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Each task in a project is unique from other tasks within the same project, even if the
tasks are related in some way. Information about a single task can be found in the Task
Information dialog box by selecting the Information button on the Task tab. The Task
Information dialog box includes all the details for a single task. Project managers can use
the Task Information dialog box to view and update task details such as resource assignments, predecessors, and task calendar. Information for a task is divided into six categories
(tabs): General, Predecessors, Resources, Advanced, Notes, and Custom Fields, as shown
in Figure 22. You can also use the Task Information dialog box to make changes to a task.

Figure 22

Task Information dialog box

Task names should be brief; therefore, more information may need to be added to a task
for clarification. This can be done with a task Note. A task Note acts as a sticky note for
a task and can be added on the Notes tab in the Task Information dialog box. A Note can
provide more information on a task such as a web link, a phone number, or even an embedded file, such as an Excel spreadsheet, that provides further information on the task.
Navigating around an Entry table uses keystrokes similar to those used in other
Microsoft applications.
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Keyboard Shortcut

Navigating the Entry Table

t

Moves the Active Cell
Up one row in the same column

b

Down one row in the same column

r
l
J
V+J
h
e
C+h
C+e
u
d
T
V+T

One column to the right
One column to the left
Down one row in same column
Up one row in same column
First column of the current row
Last column of the current row
First column and row
Last column of the last row
Up one screen
Down one screen
One column to right
One column to left

CHAPTER 1

QUICK REFERENCE

Entering Project Tasks

Now that you have prepared your project plan by adjusting the project calendar, and setting the project to schedule automatically and by start date, you are ready to create your
project plan. Patti Rochelle, the charity golf tournament planning manager, has given
you a list of tasks to enter into the project’s Entry table.
In this exercise, you will enter project tasks.

To Enter Project Tasks

PM01.06

a. If you took a break, open the pm01ch01CharityGolfTournament_LastFirst
project.

SIDE NOTE

Text Wrap
Project 2016 has a Wrap
Text feature for task
names. If the name is
longer than the column,
the text will wrap within
the cell.

Auto Scheduled
symbol

Figure 23

Task
name

b. Click in the Task Name cell in row 1. Type Set tournament objectives.
c. Press T. The default value of 1 day? will appear in the Duration column.

Undetermined
duration

Gantt bar
Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Entry table with new task default duration

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SIDE NOTE

Project-Scheduled
Changes
Whenever changes are
made to affect a start or
finish date of a task(s),
those dates will be
highlighted with a light
colored background.

d. Type 6h in the Duration column. Press T. Notice how Project 2016
assigns a Start date and Finish date because your project is set to Auto Scheduled.
The task is scheduled over two days because there are only four hours available in
in the Task Mode
a day to complete a task. Note the Auto Scheduled symbol
column.

Duration

Figure 24

Adjusted finish date
Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Entry table with task duration

SIDE NOTE

Task Information
You can also open the
Task Information dialog
box by double-clicking
a task.

e. With Set tournament objectives (Task 1) selected, click the Task tab, if necesto open the Task
sary, and then in the Properties group, click Information
Information dialog box. Explore the various tabs that can contain information about
Set tournament objectives. Click Cancel.
f.

Enter the remaining tasks below in the Entry table. Remember you can use abbreviations for the durations.

Task

Task Name

Task Duration

2

Determine project team

4 hours

3

Set tournament date and time

1 day

4

Prepare preliminary budget

6 hours

5

Create tournament website

2 weeks

6

Solicit potential tournament sponsors

1 week

7

Select tournament sponsors

4 hours

8

Solicit celebrity appearances

3 weeks

9

Create volunteer list

4 hours

10

Sign volunteer contracts

1 hour

Troubleshooting
If the Start or Finish date column displays the date as wrapped text, you may want
to widen the column. To widen a column, point to the right side of the column
border in the field name. When your pointer turns into a double-pointed arrow, drag
to the right until the date displays appropriately. As in Excel, you can also doubleclick between the columns to automatically widen the column.

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CHAPTER 1
Figure 25

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Entry table with tasks added

g. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Spelling
the task names.
h. Save

button to check the spelling of

the project.

CONSIDER THIS

Task Duration

Why is a task duration of one day being assigned a calendar duration of two days? The Project calendar
for the charity golf tournament was adjusted to a four-hour working day of 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM.
Therefore, by entering in a duration of 1d (one day = eight hours), Project scheduled the task to be
completed over two calendar days: four available hours on day 1 and four available hours on day 2.
Is using the day duration confusing? Consider entering durations in hours instead.

All the tasks are set to start on the project’s start date. Project 2016 is scheduling
this way because the project is scheduled by Start date and all tasks are scheduled to start
As Soon As Possible. Project tasks will push ahead in time as you create a more detailed
project schedule later in this workshop.
Modify Project Tasks in Project 2016
Project 2016 makes it easy to edit a project plan by adding, deleting, or changing existing
tasks. As you are planning your project, you may discover that you need to add an additional task(s) in the middle of your project plan. Project 2016 allows tasks to be inserted
by using commands on the ribbon, the shortcut menu, or the keyboard. Inserting a task
in the middle of a project plan is similar to adding a row in Excel 2016 because Project
2016 will push every subsequent task down one row and adjust the project accordingly.
Adding and Modifying Project Tasks in the Entry Table

After brainstorming at a team meeting, the charity golf tournament planning team has
identified a few additional tasks to be added to the project plan as well as an adjustment
to task durations. You will add these tasks.
In this exercise, you will modify a task list.
Creating a Project Plan

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To Modify a Task List

PM01.07
SIDE NOTE

Adding Tasks in the
Entry Table

a. Click any cell in task row 4, Prepare preliminary budget, and then click the Task
button to insert a new
tab, if necessary. In the Insert group, click the Task
row. <New Task> appears as the task name.

Similar to Excel 2016,
new task rows are added
above the active row.

Task button

New Task row added in Entry table

Figure 26

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

New task row added in Entry table

Troubleshooting
If you selected the Task arrow instead of the Task button, select Task.

b. Type Reserve golf course, and then press T. Type 1h, and then press T.
Reserve golf course becomes the new Task 4.
c. With Reserve golf course (Task 4) still selected, press the Insert I key. A blank
row is added above the selected row to create a new task. Notice how a blank row
is inserted with this method.

Blank row in Entry table

Figure 27
24

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Blank row added in Entry table

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CHAPTER 1

Troubleshooting
If your keyboard does not have an Insert key, repeat step a.

SIDE NOTE

Task Changes
When you make changes
to a task, Project 2016
will highlight the affected
tasks in the Entry table
with a light colored
background.

d. In the Task Name cell for the new Task 4, type Perform site inspections, and then
press T. Type 4h, and then press T.
e. Click in the Duration column of Task 3, Set tournament date and time, and then
type 1h to change the duration from 1 day to 1 hour.
f.

Select Solicit potential tournament sponsors (Task 8), and then on the Task tab,
in the Properties group, click Information
. If necessary, click the General tab.
In the upper right-hand corner of the General tab, change the Duration from 1 week
to 3d.

g. Click the Notes tab. Add the note Contact local sporting goods stores for a list of
potential sponsors.

Figure 28
SIDE NOTE

Task Note
Double-click the Note
icon or hover over
the Note icon in the
Indicators column to
display the note.

Task Information dialog box Notes tab

h. Click OK. Notice the Note indicator
i.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Notes tab

in the Indicators column.

Point to the note to see the note text.

Task note indicator

Task note ScreenTip

Figure 29

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Note indicator in Entry table

j.

Save

the project.

Creating a Project Plan

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QUICK REFERENCE

Inserting a Task

In the Entry table, click any cell below the row where you wish to insert a task.
• Right-click the row number of the task, and then click Insert Task from the shortcut menu, or
• Click the Task button in the Insert group on the Task tab, or
• Press Insert on the keyboard.

Deleting Project Tasks in the Entry Table

As a project planner, you may decide a project task is no longer needed. As well as inserting tasks, Project 2016 allows for tasks to be deleted. Deleting a task removes an entire
task row and moves any subsequent tasks up a row. As with inserting tasks, there are
several ways to delete tasks in Project 2016 such as using the ribbon, the shortcut menu,
or the keyboard.
Since the project team for this charity golf tournament is already in place, in this
exercise, you will delete a task.

To Delete a Task

PM01.08

a. Right-click the row selector for Determine project team (Task 2).

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Row selector

Shortcut menu

Figure 30

Task shortcut menu

b. Click Delete Task from the shortcut menu. The Determine project team task is
deleted.
c. Click the row selector for Create volunteer list (Task 10). With the task selected,
press D. Task 10 is now deleted.

Troubleshooting
If you press D on the Task Name cell of a task row, Project 2016 will prompt you
to 1) delete the task name or 2) delete the task. To avoid this prompt, select the
task row selector, and then press D.

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to undo the deletion of Task 10.

CHAPTER 1

d. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Undo

Figure 31

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Entry table with task deleted

e. Save

the project.

QUICK REFERENCE

Deleting a Task

In the Entry table, click any task row you wish to delete.
• Right-click the row number of the task, and then select Delete Task from the shortcut menu, or
• Click the row selector of the task to be deleted, and then press the Delete key on your
keyboard, or
• Click any cell of a task you want to be deleted, and then in the Editing group, on the Task tab,
click the Clear button to display the menu. Click Entire Row to delete the task.

Moving, Cutting, Copying, and Pasting
Project Tasks in the Entry Table

Project planners may decide to reorder tasks or even copy tasks. Moving tasks will simply
reorder tasks within the Entry table. If a task is cut, the task will be temporarily deleted
and placed on the Project 2016 clipboard. If a task is copied, the task stays in its current
location but is also placed on the clipboard to be pasted in another location in the Entry
table. Any tasks on the clipboard can be pasted within the Entry table of the project.
After reviewing the project tasks, you have decided it is important to prepare your
budget before you perform site inspections. Therefore, you will move Task 5.
In this exercise, you move a task in the Entry table.

PM01.09

To Move a Task
a. Click the row selector for Prepare preliminary budget (Task 5) to select the task.
b. Press and hold the row selector again (you will see a four-arrow pointer). Drag the
row selector above Perform site inspections (Task 3). As you drag Task 5, a dark
gray horizontal bar will indicate the position of the task if you were to let go of your
mouse.

Creating a Project Plan

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Horizontal bar showing placement of moved task

Selected task

Figure 32

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Moving a task in the Entry table

c. Release the mouse button. The Prepare preliminary budget task is now Task 3.

Figure 33

Entry table with task moved

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Troubleshooting
If you are having difficulty moving a task, be sure you first click the row selector
of a task. Then click the task row selector again and drag the task to the desired
location.

d. Right-click the row selector for Set tournament objectives (Task 1). Click Copy on
the shortcut menu. Click in row 12, the first blank row, and then on the Task tab in
. This creates a copy of the task.
the Clipboard group, click Paste
e. Delete the copied task.

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CHAPTER 1

Troubleshooting
When deleting Task 12, be sure to click the row selector for the task.

f.

Save

the project.

Modifying Project Tasks in Calendar View

The Project 2016 software has several views from which to edit or view your project
tasks. You can switch from one view to the other using the View Bar, which appears at
the left-hand side of the project window. Gantt Chart view displays tasks, task durations,
and task dependencies in a Gantt chart with horizontal bars and is the default view in
Project 2016. The length of the task bars in the Gantt chart relates to the task detail such
as duration and the zoom of the timescale at the top of the Gantt chart.
Calendar view displays tasks as bars on a calendar in a monthly format. Calendar
view may be used to see upcoming weekly or monthly tasks. Managers may also choose
to print from Calendar view because it gives an overview of the week or month ahead.
Patti Rochelle, the tournament planning manager, has asked you to add additional
tasks to the charity golf tournament project plan. You decide to make these additions in
the Calendar and Network Diagram views.
In this exercise, you will add and modify tasks in Calendar view.

PM01.10

To Add and Modify Tasks in Calendar View
a. Click Create volunteer list (Task 10), and then click the Task tab, if necessary.

SIDE NOTE

Alternate Method

arrow, and then click

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

You can also switch
views by using the
Calendar view
on
the View Bar.

b. On the Task tab, in the View group, click the Gantt Chart
Calendar to switch to Calendar view.

Figure 34

Calendar view

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Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

c. In Calendar view, click Week to change the calendar to Week view format.

Figure 35

Week view option in Calendar view

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

d. With Calendar view in the Week format and Task 10 still selected, click the Task tab,
button to add a new blank task.
if necessary. In the Insert group, click the Task

New task added

Figure 36

New task added in Calendar view

e. Double-click <New Task>, 1 day? on the Calendar to open the Task Information
dialog box.

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Figure 37

On the General tab of the Task Information dialog box, click in the Name box, and
then type Begin online registrations. Press T, and then type 0d in the Duration
box to enter the Milestone task.

CHAPTER 1

f.

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Task Information dialog box

g. Click OK.

New task

Figure 38

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Calendar view with new task added

SIDE NOTE

Milestone Task
Notice the milestone task
is identified in the Gantt
chart as a diamond.

h. Click Gantt Chart
on the View Bar on the left-hand side of the Project 2016
window to view the new Task 10 in the Gantt chart.

Troubleshooting
If the View Bar is not visible on the left-hand side of the Project 2016 window,
right-click the vertical text GANTT CHART on the left-hand side of the Project 2016
window, and then click View Bar.

i.

Click in the Task Name cell of Task 10. Click the Gantt Chart Tools Format tab.
twice to wrap the text of the new task.
In the Columns group, click Wrap Text
Notice the wrapped text of the task names in the Entry table.

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j.

Figure 39

Click the row selector for Begin online registrations (Task 10), and then move
the task above Solicit potential tournament sponsors (Task 7). Begin online
registrations is now Task 7.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Gantt Chart view with new task added and moved

k. Save

the project.

Modifying Project Tasks in Network Diagram View

Not only can tasks be added in Gantt Chart view and Calendar view, but they can also be
added and modified in Network Diagram view. Network Diagram view also displays
tasks and task dependencies. However, this view provides more information by displaying each task in a detailed box and clearly representing task dependencies with link lines.
The Network Diagram also displays the critical path. The critical path consists of tasks
(or a single task) that determine the project’s Finish date (or Start date); tasks on the critical path are considered critical tasks. The main purpose of the Network Diagram is to
assist project managers in viewing the critical path.
Critical tasks are displayed in light red on the network diagram. A critical task must
be completed on time in order to meet the project’s Finish date (or Start date). A task
becomes critical based on the task dependencies, task durations, and task resource assignments. Project managers must monitor critical tasks to be sure they are being completed
on time in order to successfully meet the project schedule. You decide to switch to this
view and add another project task.
In this exercise, you will add and modify tasks in Network Diagram view.

To Add and Modify Tasks in Network Diagram View

PM01.11

a. With Task 7 still selected, click Network Diagram
to Network Diagram view.

SIDE NOTE

Identifying a Critical
Task
Task 10 is a critical task
because at this point in
the planning process,
Task 10 has the longest
duration.

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on the View Bar to switch

b. Scroll down the Network Diagram as necessary to view Begin online registrations
(ID: 7). Note the shape of this task is different from the other tasks with a rectangle
shape because Task 7 is a milestone task. Also note the task has a black background because it is the selected task.
c. Scroll down again until you see Solicit celebrity appearances (Task 10). Note this
task appears in red because it is a critical task.

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Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Milestone task

Critical task

Figure 40

Network Diagram view of tasks

SIDE NOTE

Tasks in Network
Diagram View
A selected task in the
Network Diagram will
appear with a black background and white text.

d. While still in Network Diagram view, scroll up, and then click Create tournament
website (Task 6) to select the task.
e. Click the Task tab, and then in the Insert group, click Task
to add a new blank
task in Network Diagram view. The new blank task becomes Task 6 with Create
tournament website (Task 7) still selected.
f.

Double-click the <New Task> rectangle to open the Task Information dialog box.

SIDE NOTE

Troubleshooting

Adding a New Task in
the Network Diagram

If you clicked on the new task’s border, the Format Box dialog box will appear. Click
Cancel, and then double click inside the task box instead.

You can also add a task
in Network Diagram view
by clicking in a blank
area of the Network
Diagram and dragging to
draw a small rectangle.

g. Click the General tab of the Task Information dialog box, add the Name Design
tournament logo, and then press T.
h. Enter a Duration of 1d, and then click OK. The new task has the task name Design
tournament logo with a duration of one day.
i.

With Design tournament logo (Task 6) still selected, click one time in the Dur: box,
type 2d, and then press J to change the duration of the task from one day to
two days.

Troubleshooting
If the Task 6 Task Information dialog box opened when attempting to adjust the
duration, you double-clicked the task. Close the Task Information dialog box, and
then click once to select Task 6.

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j.

Select Reserve golf course (Task 5). Change the duration of Task 5 to 0d to make
this task a milestone and change the shape of the task in Network Diagram view.

Microsoft Project 2016, Windows 10, Microsoft Corporation

Task duration changed

New task added

Figure 41

Network Diagram view with task additions and changes

k. Click Gantt Chart on the View Bar to return to Gantt Chart view. Note the new tasks
and the change in durations.
l.

Click Design tournament logo (Task 6). Click the Gantt Chart Tools Format tab,
twice.
and then in the Columns group, click Wrap Text

m. Save

the project.

CONSIDER THIS

How Can You Motivate Team Members?

Have you ever been a member of a team? How did your coach motivate you? Did your coach recognize
team successes as they occurred? Project successes can be recognized by milestones. Therefore,
milestones can help motivate the project team by recognizing project accomplishments.

Create Task Dependencies
When creating a project schedule, if you do not define task dependencies, all tasks will
start on the project Start date or finish on the project Finish date. However, in most
projects, tasks may be dependent on other tasks. Therefore, Project 2016 allows project
planners to create task dependencies.
Task dependencies create predecessor tasks and successor tasks. For example, you could
not begin a task of “begin online registrations” without first completing the task of “set
tournament date and time.” In this case, “set tournament date and time” would be the
predecessor task to “begin online registrations” (which then becomes the successor task).
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CONSIDER THIS

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Remember, project managers often use the terms relationship, dependency, or link when
referring to how the predecessor or successor tasks are connected.

Why Create Task Dependencies?

Have you ever baked a cake? If so, then you know you need to purchase the ingredients before mixing
them together; mix the ingredients together before pouring them into a pan; prepare the pan before
pouring in the ingredients; heat the oven before putting the pan into the oven to bake, etc. Baking a
cake is a project during which tasks are completed in a certain order. This order is defined by task
dependencies.

There are four types of task dependencies in Project 2016, as shown in Table 4:

Type

Detail

Example

Finish-to-Start
(FS)

Default. Task 1 must
finish before Task 2
can start.

You must finish selecting the tournament
date (Task 1) before beginning online
registration (Task 2).

Start-to-Start
(SS)

Task 1 must start before
Task 2 can start.

As soon as the tournament website goes
live (Task 1), you can start accepting online
registrations (Task 2).

Start-to-Finish
(SF)

Task 1 must start before
Task 2 can finish.

You must start working on the tournament
website (Task 1) before you can finish
promotional materials (Task 2).

Finish-to-Finish
(FF)

Task 1 must finish before
Task 2 can finish.

You must finish accepting online registrations
(Task 1) before you finaliz